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Archive for the tag “King Salman”

Khashoggi Case Could Be Death Of US-Saudi Friendship

Until two weeks ago, Western officials could, and did, excuse MbS’s domestic authoritarianism by citing his apparent reordering of a Saudi Islam as being moderate rather than the extremist version which produced, via irresponsible religious education and charitable giving, 9/11 and the Islamic State. Not any longer.

Read Here – The Hill

Also Read: The Irony Of Turkey’s Crusade For A Missing Journalist

Cabinet Reshuffle, Crackdown On Corruption In Saudi Arabia

King Salman announced two key changes in the Saudi Cabinet and ordered the formation of a super committee to combat corruption. The committee is to be headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. In its first decision, the committee ordered the arrests of a number of princes and big businessmen for their involvement in corruption in different cases.

Read Here – Arab News

Also Read: Saudi Arabia Arrests Princes And Ex-Ministers Amid Anti-Corruption Crackdown

Saudi King Seeks Oil-Pact Extension On ‘Epochal’ Russia Visit

Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz is making an historic first visit to Russia by a monarch of the Gulf kingdom as he and President Vladimir Putin seek an understanding on whether to extend an agreement curbing oil supplies.

Palace Intrigues In The Desert Kingdom

The new Crown Prince has established close ties with President Trump, his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and the administration’s senior security officials, who see the prince as a moderniser and a solid ally against Iran. This is an important partnership since the prince will need all the help he can get in those uncertain days when his father leaves this mortal world.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Saudi King’s Son Plotted Effort To Oust His Rival

As next in line to be king of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Nayef was unaccustomed to being told what to do. Then, one night in June, he was summoned to a palace in Mecca, held against his will and pressured for hours to give up his claim to the throne. By dawn, he had given in, and Saudi Arabia woke to the news that it had a new crown prince: the king’s 31-year-old son, Mohammed bin Salman.

Read Here – The New York Times

The Long-term Cost Of Saudi Succession Shake-Up

King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud’s decision to remove Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef and promote his favorite son, Defense Minister Mohammed bin Salman, has been long anticipated. It raises profound questions about the future stability of America’s oldest ally in the Middle East. 

Read Here – Al Monitor

Saudis Thinking Beyond Oil In Asia Courtship

China’s role and influence in global markets is a big lure to Saudi Arabia. It is the world’s largest energy consumer and the second-biggest importer of crude, after the U.S. Just like the Japanese, China is driven by its need to secure sources of energy. That gives Saudi Arabia an opportunity to solidify its market presence in Asia amid rising competition from Russia.

Read Here – Bloomberg

The Power Struggle For The Throne And The Saudi ‘Reset’ With Trump

Ultimately, of course, policy differences, not personal ones, will matter most. Everyone in the Saudi leadership shares with the Trump administration a common view on the dangers posed by Iran. But there’s a gap in their respective positions on the war in Yemen and how the kingdom can best be extricated from it.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

King’s Visit Fuses Saudi Vision 2030 And Belt And Road Initiative

Given its core Islamic values, Saudi Arabia plays a vital role in politics, economy, religion and security affairs in the Middle East and among Islamic countries. China is the key focus of Salman’s Asia tour. The trip is the first between top leaders of both countries since President Xi’s Middle East visit, and represents Saudi Arabia’s positive attitude toward China’s Belt and Road initiative.

Read Here – Global Times, China

Can Mohamed Bin Salman Reshape Saudi Arabia?

His command of the issues was solid, his delivery even better. His body language signaled confidence, even though he was the youngest and least experienced person in the room. He had charisma. But most important of all, he made a more powerful case for his country than any Saudi official had done before.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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