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Archive for the tag “laws”

How the World Bank Influences Regulatory Policy

The ease of doing business indicator, known as EDB, is a system that ranks the regulatory environment in countries around the world. New research looks at how the World Bank’s ease of doing business index has amassed considerable influence over business regulations worldwide. The financial institution has succeeded in doing so even though it doesn’t have an explicit mandate over regulatory policy.

Read Here – Knowledge@Wharton

Australia’s Fight Against Chinese Political Interference

Last December, while introducing legislation to outlaw foreign interference in Australian politics, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the Australian Parliament that the scale of the threat to Australian democracy and sovereignty from foreign influence campaigns was “unprecedented.” Turnbull did not name any country in particular, but the proposed laws were clearly aimed primarily at Chinese covert interference.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

China, EU Seize Control Of The World’s Cyber Agenda

The United States is losing ground as the internet’s standard-bearer in the face of aggressive European privacy standards and China’s draconian vision for a tightly controlled Web. The weakening American position comes as the European Union, filling a gap left by years of lax U.S. regulations, imposes data privacy requirements that companies like Facebook and Google must follow.

Read Here – Politico

Digital Armament

Besides the shiny world of social media, hard information technology work has been part of the U.S. governments for decades, but critics believe that the way the government deals with cyber issues is outdated or doesn’t even exist appropriately. Recently, the White House published the long-awaited Cybersecurity Strategy and Implementation Plan (CSIP), which aims to strengthen and protect the federal networks and systems.

Read Here – The European

Modi, One Year On

The election in May 2014 of a new government in India raised expectations around the world of the likelihood of far-reaching changes in India’s economic and foreign policy orientation. This report examines both the promises and the concrete steps taken by Narendra Modi’s government in the areas of: defense, education, energy, healthcare, innovation & IPR, labor, trade and investment.

Read Here – Hudson Institute

Oh, That Horrible Feeling Again…

India’s prosperous future has hardly ever seemed farther away than it does today. The country’s ongoing economic crisis has darkened the atmosphere — and done so in a way tragically familiar to most Indians.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

 

In China, Prostitution And Corruption Go Hand In Hand

If the Xi Jinping administration truly wants to address corruption, then China’s prostitution problem needs to be addressed as a part of the anti-graft campaign. In order to address this issue, local law enforcement urgently needs to be reformed. Authorities should not be incentivized to collect fees or fines from prostitutes to cover operational costs. In order to root out violence against the prostitutes, police must be trained in how to handle suspects properly.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Social Media Cracks Open The Black Box Of Saudi Society

When the Corruption Perception Index 2012 was published last week, the Saudi Twittersphere wasn’t very thrilled. Transparency International‘s annual study of perceptions about corruption among public-sector officials showed that Saudi Arabia had fallen nine places, and ranked number 66 out of 174. This provoked a storm of discussion on Twitter.

Read Here – The National

Russians Are Afraid – and for Good Reason

Recent developments in Russia have evoked memories of a famous line by Vladimir Lenin: “The courts should not do away with terror … but should give it foundation and legality, clearly, honestly and without embellishments.” In just the six months since he reseated himself as president,Vladimir Putin has been busy creating a legislative framework that might make Lenin proud.

Under the Soviet legal system, the court was an arm of the government, a system designed to protect the state from an individual, rather than to protect an individual from the state. Treason was defined in the Soviet Criminal Code as being part of a public group that acted “under the influence” of the bourgeoisie. This all sounds eerily similar to trends resurfacing in today’s Russia, except that Putin has been less candid about what his framework could enable, beyond describing a need for “stability.” More likely he wants to instill fear, albeit without the terror of the past. He wants a more civilized, acceptable reinterpretation of the Soviet period, although that is hardly consolation for Russia’s beleaguered civil society and opposition.

Read Here – The Moscow Times

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