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Archive for the tag “military”

Will Pakistan’s Military Lose Its Grip On Power?

Many Pakistanis see the army as the real power behind Khan and the cause of the country’s political and economic woes. Their anger has occasioned a remarkable shift as major political figures speak out for the first time against the military’s dominance of Pakistan—a shift that could eventually threaten the military’s chokehold on political power.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

2020 Gave India A Sharp Lesson on the Chinese Military. When Will Indian Generals Take Heed?

The May 2020 Ladakh crisis marks a turning point in India-China relations, since both sides have crossed each other’s red lines. By grabbing 1,000 square km of Indian territory in Ladakh, China has made it known that bilateral peace and stability will be on its terms.

Read Here | The Wire

Also read | PLA Using ‘Exoskeleton Suits’ On Himalayan Border

The Military Seeds Of Pakistan’s Discontent

When General Pervez Musharraf stepped down as Pakistan’s president in 2008, many had hoped the nation’s coup-riddled politics were headed in a decidedly more democratic direction. Fast forward to the present, Pakistan has moved from a brief period as a functional electoral democracy to Prime Minister Imran Khan’s “hybrid” regime, where elected and military officials share political and economic power.

Read Here | Asia Times

China’s Monster Fishing Fleet

Though not alone in its destructive practices, Beijing’s rapacious fleet causes humanitarian disasters and has a unique military mission.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

Withdrawal From Afghanistan Is Trump’s Gift To Joe Biden

For Biden, the Trump decision was a move he might have made more than ten years ago, when he thought it was his duty to keep a young president from being rolled by the guys with the stars on their shoulders.

Read Here | The National Interest

Trump’s New Defense Secretary Announces Afghan Withdrawal

The Trump administration will draw down U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq to 2,500 troops in each country before President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration in January, acting Defense Secretary Chris Miller confirmed in a statement Tuesday, a move that will put the outgoing president at odds with Republicans in Congress and the incoming Biden team.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

US-India Military Alliance Comes Into View

The mystery about the awkward timing of the so-called 2+2 US-Indian security dialogue to be held in New Delhi on Tuesday, October 27, is largely because there is a chicken-and-egg situation about it. It is impossible to decide which of two things caused the other one – the mushrooming US-Indian military alliance, or the continuing downhill slide in the India-China relationship. 

Read Here | Asia Times

Sharif Breaks The Chains Of Fear

This speech of Sharif’s has raised the temperature of the politics of Pakistan and now it is the government of Imran Khan, General Bajwa and General Faiz that is feeling the heat. A defiant Sharif ready to lock horns with the current leadership of the establishment was the last thing Khan would have wanted, as his survival is dependent on Bajwa and Faiz.

Read Here | Asia Times

“Preparing for War”: What Is China’s Xi Jinping Trying To Tell Us?

The U.S. military is already strapped for resources trying to police the Indo-Pacific, and this is peacetime. If the United States lost a sizable fraction of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and affiliated joint forces in a contest in the Taiwan Strait—even a triumphant one—its capacity to retain its superpower standing and preside over the liberal maritime order would be diminished. It could win locally but lose globally.

Read Here | The National Interest

These NATO Nuances Create National Security Issues

What ails the Atlantic alliance is not a lack of capabilities or resources—after all, the Euro-Atlantic basin holds eight hundred million people, a combined $20 trillion in gross domestic product and several of the world’s leading military powers—but the political commitment to use them. 

Read Here | The National Interest

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