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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “military”

Trust Must Be Built Between Beijing And Delhi

To better manage disputes and differences, it is now imperative to build trust between Beijing and New Delhi. The foreign policy and strategic circles of the two countries need to maintain dialogues and communications on a regular basis. Equally important, people-to-people exchanges are indispensable to consolidate better understanding of the will of the people of the two countries.

Read Here – The Indian Express

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China Flexes Its Military Muscle In Tibet, Close To Border Dispute With India

Chinese troops have taken part in a military exercise using live ammunition in Tibet, as the country remains locked in a stand-off with India in a disputed border area close by, state media reported.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Making The Most Of A Coup

No state leader likes the thought of putschists plotting to bring him or her down. But Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan certainly knows how to make the most out of a coup attempt. In the year since a faction of the military tried to overthrow his administration, the Turkish president has neutralised a large swath of his political opposition, undertaken major reforms to enhance his powers and stayed the course with his expansionist foreign policy.

Read Here – Stratfor

Japan’s Arms Merchants Are Off To A Rocky Start

When Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government redrew Japan’s self-imposed arms export restrictions in 2014, it hoped to spark a revolution in a domestic defense industry that had been isolated for almost 40 years. In part, it succeeded. In June, Japanese companies such as Fuji and Kawasaki Heavy Industries displayed military helicopters and warplanes at the Maritime Air Systems and Technologies Asia exhibition in Tokyo – still a rare event for the pacifist nation…

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

High Noon In The Himalayas: Behind The China-India Standoff At Doka La

Map courtesy: War on the Rocks

If you’re struggling to make sense of the latest standoff between the Chinese and Indian militaries 10,000 feet in the Himalayas, don’t fret: You’re in good company. The showdown at Doka La is the product of a multi-layered, multi-party dispute steeped in centuries-old treaties and ambiguous territorial claims. Only recently have sufficient details emerged to piece together a coherent picture of the crisis and we’re still left with more questions than answers.

Read Here – War on the Rocks

China Should Assess India’s Power Dialectically – People’s Daily

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping. File Photo/PIB

Following the recent Sikkim standoff and the finger-pointing between China and India, the Chinese public and media outlets have once again taken notice of their long-neglected neighbour, with many experts calling for a better understanding of India’s current power. “India’s [power] should be assessed dialectically. It would be wrong to prettify or look down on our neighbour. Instead, we should objectively analyse India’s pros and cons,” Lin Minwang, a professor at the Institute of International Studies of Fudan University, told Xiakedao, a public WeChat account operated by the People’s Daily.

Read Here – People’s Daily

What China Means When It Says India Needs To ‘Remember The Lessons From History’

In the last three weeks, as the Modi government’s dispute with China has become increasingly more acerbic, Beijing has been issuing a series of warnings to New Delhi, the most serious of which has been its observation that India has not learned the lessons of history and has not forgotten its humiliating defeat in 1962. These are a small step away from an ultimatum.

Read Here – The Wire

Also Read: Six Expert Views on How India Should Look at the Latest Border Stand-Off With China

As the Splintered History Of Lost Kingdoms Unravels, India, China Need To Confront The Future

It is interesting that in invoking historical justifications in the latest standoff between China and India in the Sikkim and Bhutan tri-junction area, neither party is keen to recall that the region once constituted sovereign principalities – of Tibet, Sikkim and Bhutan. Of the three, Bhutan is still independent, Tibet was taken over by China in 1951 and Sikkim became part of India only in 1975 by the exercise of Article 2 of the Indian constitution. The controversies behind these takeovers is another matter, but the moot point is that the histories of these erstwhile states have been splintered beyond recognition as they have been absorbed into other historical streams.

Read Here – The Wire

European Allies Want Used F-16s, But Are There Enough To Go Around?

American allies across Europe want used F-16 fighter jets, but there might not be enough planes to go around, U.S. Air Force officials say. First produced in 1974 by General Dynamics and built since 1993 by Lockheed and its successor Lockheed Martin, the F-16 is attractive to some NATO allies that are increasing or planning to increase defense spending and weapons purchases in the wake of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea.

Read Here – Defense One

Saudi Arabia’s Dream Of Becoming The Dominant Arab And Muslim Power In The World Has Gone Down In Flames

The attempt by Saudi Arabia and Gulf oil states to achieve hegemony in the Arab and Sunni Muslim worlds has proved disastrous for almost everybody. The capture of east Aleppo by the Syrian Army and the likely fall of Mosul to the Iraqi Army means defeat for that the Sunni Arabs in a great swathe of territory stretching from Iran to the Mediterranean.

Read Here – Independent

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