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Archive for the tag “military”

After Raucous Welcome In India, Trump Clinches $3 Billion Military Equipment Sale

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi meeting the U.S. President Donald Trump in New Delhi. Photo/PIB

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that India will buy $3 billion worth of military equipment, including attack helicopters, as the two countries deepen defence and commercial ties in an attempt to balance the weight of China in the region. India and the United States were also making progress on a big trade deal, Trump said. Negotiators from the two sides have wrangled for months to narrow differences on farm goods, medical devices, digital trade and new tariffs.

Read Here – Reuters

The Surprising Success Of The U.S.-Indian Partnership

India and the United States are far from becoming formal allies. They are dogged by persistent trade disagreements, which India shows no inclination to settle. But given Trump’s record with other U.S. allies, his administration has been surprisingly lenient when it comes to India’s uncompetitive trade practices. It has also kept mum about India’s feared drift toward illiberalism, enabling both countries to push ahead on strategic, especially defense, cooperation, which has always been the lodestar that guides U.S.-Indian relations.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Is This General Bringing China’s Xinjiang Model To India?

As the most powerful Indian military boss in decades — and potentially ever — Gen. Bipin Rawat’s words carry weight. So when India’s chief of defense staff (CDS) spoke about “deradicalization camps” for Kashmiris at an event in New Delhi, it alarmed not just Kashmiris who have been under a siege since India stripped the conflict-ridden state of its statehood, but also ex-army men and human rights activists across the country.

Read Here – Ozy

China’s Military Advancements In The 2010s: Air And Ground

The first decade of the 21st century has seen the Chinese military (People’s Liberation Army or PLA) undergo a number of major changes, which many observers around the world have kept a keen eye on. Indeed, among the world’s major military forces, the breadth and speed with which the PLA and the Chinese military industry have changed from the beginning of 2010 to the end of 2019 is quite remarkable.

Read Here – The Diplomat

India’s New Security Order

How should observers assess India’s new security order? And what implications, if any, does it have for the United States? There are three characteristics of the new order: an emphasis on risk-taking and assertiveness, the fusing of domestic and international politics, and the use of unrelenting spin to hold critics at bay. This approach carries potential benefits for the United States in bolstering its position in Asia. But it also brings a set of risks and challenges that demand clear-eyed analysis — and a willingness to debate how the United States engages with India moving forward.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Pakistan’s Massive March Calls Out Military Overreach

Pakistan’s powerful military is struggling to keep its grip on power as the country seethes with anger over the rising cost of living caused by sluggish economic growth, political victimisation, narrowing space for freedom of expression, and the militarisation of politics.

Read Here – The Diplomat

 

Xi Says No Force Can Ever Undermine China’s Status

No force can ever undermine China’s status, or stop the Chinese people and nation from marching forward, President Xi Jinping said on Tuesday, China’s National Day. Xi, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission, made the remarks in a speech delivered at a grand rally in central Beijing to celebrate the 70th founding anniversary of the People’s Republic of China.

Read Here – XInhua

Also Read: China’s Latest Display Of Military Might Suggests Its ‘Nuclear Triad’ Is Complete

Intra-Gulf Competition In Africa’s Horn: Lessening The Impact

What’s new? Middle Eastern states are accelerating their competition for allies, influence and physical presence in the Red Sea corridor, including in the Horn of Africa. Rival Gulf powers in particular are jockeying to set the terms of a new regional power balance and benefit from future economic growth.

Read Here – International Crisis Group

China At 70 Faces Three Challenges: Taiwan, The US And Hong Kong. Can Xi Jinping Deliver?

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Beijing is busy preparing for this momentous occasion, carefully planning which weapons to display in the annual military parade, but even these celebrations cannot distract the people from the slew of issues currently facing the nation. 

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Is Russia Worried About China’s Military Rise?

Even with its economy starting to slow down, China’s military is still on the rise. Years of higher military spending fueled by high economic growth are starting to manifest themselves in new technologies and newfound assertiveness. Beijing has made visible strides in its aviation, naval, and missile defense capabilities. Whether it be making territorial claims in the South China Sea or opening up its first overseas military base in Djibouti, China is starting to exert military influence in its near abroad and beyond.

Read Here – The National Interest

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