looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “minority”

China Has Chosen Cultural Genocide in Xinjiang – For Now

The news out of Xinjiang, China’s western region, this summer has been a steady stream of Orwellian horrors. A million people held against their will in political reeducation camps. Intelligence officials assigned as “adopted” members of civilian families. Checkpoints on every corner and mandatory spyware installed on every device. The targets of this police state are China’s Muslim Uighur minority, whose loyalties the central government has long distrusted for both nationalist and religious reasons.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Trump Is Scaring Indian Americans Into Finding Their Political Voice

Especially with the recent violent attacks against a Sikh man in Washington, an Indian immigrant in South Carolina, and two Indian engineers in Kansas, Indian Americans have found themselves jolted out of this comfortable liminal space.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Being Indian In Trump’s America

The incitement sixteen years ago was 9/11. Today it is Donald Trump. The President’s nationalistic rhetoric and scapegoating of racial others, not to mention his habitual reliance on unverified information, have sown panic among immigrants.

Read Here – The New Yorker

Advantage US, As China Fades In Sri Lanka’s War Crimes Debate

Far from the South China Sea’s unfolding turbulence, the calmer waters of the Indian Ocean are witnessing a more subtle geopolitical power play, in which China is losing its leverage over Sri Lanka to the United States. The shift comes amid a raging domestic debate in the strategically located island nation over the investigation of atrocities committed during the country’s civil war, which ended in 2009.

Read Here – DailyFT

In Wickremesinghe Victory, New Delhi Hopes For Better Sri Lanka Ties

Ranil Wickremesinghe, who is poised to become the new Prime Minister of Sri Lanka, is seen by New Delhi as a more trustworthy partner in the neighbourhood than former president Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Riding A Thin Rope

Post-conflict Sri Lanka’s engagement with China was pure pragmatism. It had little to do with turning away from India or the West. Had Sri Lanka not taken the risk to turn to China and other countries in the East such as Japan and Korea for the sake of good relations with India or the West, there would have been a serious setback to Sri Lanka’s economic advancement.

Read Here – The Island

Myanmar’s Mad Monks

Myanmar is home to a growing wave of anti-Muslim sentiment, as seen in the troubling 969 movement. The numerical significance of the digits is rooted in Buddhism’s Three Jewels (Tiratana), which comprise 24 attributes: nine special attributes of Lord Buddha, six core Buddhist teachings, and nine attributes of monkhood. 

Read Here – The Diplomat

Devolution, Dangers And Sri Lanka

The Thirteenth Amendment was the direct result of the Indo-Lanka Accord, an international treaty between India and Sri Lanka. The treaty acknowledges that Sri Lanka is a “multiethnic and a multilingual plural society” and that the majority Tamil-speaking Northern and Eastern Provinces are areas of historic Tamil habitation. In theory, it also limits the majority community’s ability to determine the fate of the minority communities, and seeks to create for them some space for self-governance.

Read Here – The Hindu

Militants, the bane of Pakistan’s future

Pakistan is in the grips of militancy because of its fraught relationship with India, with which it has fought three wars and innumerable skirmishes since the countries separated in 1947. Militants were cultivated as an equalizer, to make Pakistan safer against a much larger foe. But they have done the opposite, killing Pakistanis at home and increasing the likelihood of catastrophic conflicts abroad.

Read Here – The New York Times

Viewpoint – Time To Push Back Over Sri Lankan Impunity

International attention on Sri Lanka has focused recently on a devastating report from the United Nations reviewing its own failure to protect civilians during the humanitarian catastrophe of the final months of the island nation’s civil war in 2009. Yet as many in the international community have been looking back, a new, quieter crisis is threatening Sri Lanka’s battered democracy – and the chances of lasting peace – with the government of President Mahinda Rajapaksa moving to impeach the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Should the impeachment effort succeed, it will complete a constitutional coup begun in September 2010 with the 18th amendment to the constitution, which ended presidential term limits and removed the independence of commissions on the police, human rights, judiciary, bribery and other areas of governance.

What some have framed as a battle for power between the judiciary and executive is in fact a one-sided assault on an already weakened legal system, which has for decades, but particularly under President Rajapaksa, routinely done the executive’s bidding.

Read Here – CNN

The International Crisis Group Report on Sri Lanka

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: