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Archive for the tag “Myanmar”

The Sun Never Set On The British Empire’s Oppression

Across Asia, in places such as Myanmar, India, and Hong Kong, leaders that espouse nationalist rhetoric and bemoan their former colonial overlords see no issue with deploying laws designed by those foreign masters against their own people. These lasting vestiges of the British empire are draconian, overly broad, and vaguely worded, but they persist very much because of these traits, existing as powerful weapons of modern lawfare.

Read Here | The Atlantic

The Global Tremors Of Myanmar’s Coup

Given Myanmar’s strategic location, violent turmoil there could destabilize the entire region. Already, the crisis caused by the military coup is shaking a key pillar of regional order, with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations split over how to respond.

Read Here | Project Syndicate

Myanmar Generals’ Path To ‘Eternal Peace’

When the National League for Democracy closed its first term in government last year, peacebuilding in Myanmar was already at a crossroads. Now, following the military coup, observers are asking what approach the generals might take to secure the “eternal peace” prescribed in the declaration justifying the emergency state.

Read Here | The Diplomat

Myanmar’s Coup Was A Chronicle Foretold

The putsch, the first in Myanmar since 1988, came after days of swirling rumors and reports of an impending military action. And like previous coups in the country, it was justified in the name of democracy: Myanmar’s constitution allows the army to take power in order to prevent any situation that “may disintegrate the Union or disintegrate national solidarity or that may cause the loss of sovereignty.” 

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Myanmar Results Point To Aung San Suu Kyi’s Enduring Popularity

The NLD has scored largely because of Suu Kyi. This is despite the patchy record of the current NLD government in terms of pushing the country’s development or in taking forward the ethnic peace and reconciliation process. Hugely popular still, she is seen as someone who could stand up to the military. 

Read Here | The Indian Express

Why China Wants Suu Kyi to Win Myanmar’s Polls

As Myanmar enters an election season, the economy, Covid-19 and issues of war and peace are expected to dominate the campaign trail discourse. But for the international community, speculation centers on which direction foreign policy will likely take after the poll: toward an even stronger and closer relationship with China or a shift towards a more independent posture.

Read Here | Asia Times

China, Myanmar Tighten Their Belt And Road Ties

China and Myanmar agreed to accelerate several joint infrastructure deals and projects during President Xi Jinping’s historic visit to the country, giving new impetus to commercial relations that have revived under Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Xi visited Myanmar on January 17 and 18, marking the first time a Chinese leader traveled to the Southeast Asian country in nearly two decades and coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the two sides establishing formal diplomatic relations.

Read Here – Asia Times

What Aung San Suu Kyi Saw: Myanmar’s Leader Heads To The Hague

If it’s true that no person ever consciously chooses evil — a philosophical saw suggested by Mary Wollstonecraft, the mother of the author of Frankenstein — Aung San Suu Kyi’s transformation from perfectly sympathetic former political prisoner to perfectly unsympathetic alleged war criminal is even more baffling.

Read Here – OZY

In Rich Singapore, Why Must Migrant Workers Go Hungry?

World renowned for its meticulous planning and distinct skyline that featured in the Hollywood hit film Crazy Rich Asians, Singapore depends on a large pool of blue collar migrant workers from countries like India, Bangladesh and Myanmar to power its building and construction sector, which was valued at nearly US$22.5 billion in 2018

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China Seeks Big-Ticket Payback From Myanmar

As China surges forward again in Myanmar, new pressure to restart a controversial dam project could represent a watershed moment for bilateral relations. The Beijing-backed US$3.6 billion Myitsone dam project, which if built as previously designed would flood 600 square kilometers of forestland in northern Kachin state and export 90 % of the power produced to China, was suspended by Myanmar’s previous military-dominated government in September 2011.

Read Here – Asia Times

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