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Archive for the tag “national security”

India’s Chinese App Ban Seen Jolting ByteDance’s India Plans

An Indian ban on dozens of Chinese apps following a border clash between the two nations has possibly derailed a $1 billion India expansion plan of China’s ByteDance, while also sparking an uproar from users of its popular TikTok video app. TikTok was blocked on Google and Apple app stores in India after New Delhi said it was among the 59 apps which it believed posed a “threat to sovereignty and integrity”.

Read Here – Reuters

Health Policy Belongs To The National Security Domain, Stakeholders Must Engage

Few nations are truly prepared for a pandemic of this nature and scale. India does possess some advantages in terms of the state’s decades of experience when it comes to fighting communicable diseases and natural disasters. But it also has the challenge of responding to this pandemic while continuing to battle legacy health challenges. Its health systems are likely to be overwhelmed unless it is able to moderate the surge of COVID19 and this has motivated the stringent lockdown.

Read Here – ORF

Toward A New Theory Of Power Projection

Now that the pandemic crisis is hammering America’s finances, U.S. strategy risks veering even further into permanent insolvency. Even before the crisis, the military demands of an intense global competition with China, Russia, and secondary competitors like Iran and North Korea were becoming financially untenable. Now, the costs of the current crisis — in both the short and long term — are likely to lead to further cuts from the defense budget and may call into question the sustainability of major U.S. commitments.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Will China And India Collaborate Or Feud Over Afghanistan?

As China-India competition continues unabated, Afghanistan is somewhat insulated from their more sensitive security concerns. Unlike in Iran and other countries, where the competitive aspects of the relationship are emphasised due to geopolitical reasons, Afghanistan allows the two Asian giants to compartmentalise touchy issues and cooperate on common interests such as counterterrorism.

Read Here – The National Interest

Too Big To Prevail

When executives at the biggest U.S. technology companies are confronted with the argument that they have grown too powerful and should be broken up, they have a ready response: breaking up Big Tech would open the way for Chinese dominance and thereby undermine U.S. national security. In a new era of great-power competition, the argument goes, the United States cannot afford to undercut superstar companies such as Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet (the parent company of Google).

Read Here –  Foreign Affairs

The Three Elephants Of European Security

To understand why, Europeans and Americans  need to address three elephants crowding the room of European security — some familiar, some less so. As so often with indoor pachyderms, they irritate, as they confront us with our inability to address them and our tendency to tiptoe around them. The three European security elephants will resonate differently depending on which side of the Atlantic you reside. But they need to be seen, and tackled, together.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Exploring China’s Orwellian Digital Silk Road

By acting as network architects and administrators, Beijing will be privy to data streams in real-time across a large portion of the world, enabling them to develop influence and power across a number of different matrixes.

Read Here – The National Interest

India’s Grand Strategy Needs A Second Act

…India is facing a chasm between its global aspirations and the reality of its national power. A confluence of disruptive factors has now made the business-as-usual approach simply unsustainable. A course correction if not undertaken and executed sensibly could imperil India’s rise for the next generation.

Read Here – Economic & Political Weekly

India’s New Security Order

How should observers assess India’s new security order? And what implications, if any, does it have for the United States? There are three characteristics of the new order: an emphasis on risk-taking and assertiveness, the fusing of domestic and international politics, and the use of unrelenting spin to hold critics at bay. This approach carries potential benefits for the United States in bolstering its position in Asia. But it also brings a set of risks and challenges that demand clear-eyed analysis — and a willingness to debate how the United States engages with India moving forward.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

The Quarter Billion Dollar Question: How Is Disinformation Gaming Ad Tech?

Disinformation is harmful on and offline. The people who spread disinformation have various motives. They might use it to seek attention, promote an ideology, sway an opinion, or receive financial gain.1 The issue of financial motivation is particularly problematic when it comes to programmatic advertising…Those who seek to disinform have taken advantage of an increasingly connected world to push online narratives that sow division and spark conflict.

Read Here – Global Disinformation Index

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