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Archive for the tag “nationalism”

China’s Self-Defeating Nationalism

Although the main objective of Beijing’s nationalist push has been to build domestic support for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), it has also stoked tensions with Washington, as each side tries to outdo the other in shifting blame and avoiding accountability for its handling of COVID-19.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Modi Versus Xi: The Battle Of The Nationalist Strongmen

Narendra Modi and Xi Jinping, like other contemporaries Donald Trump, Viktor Orban, Boris Johnson, etc., are leaders with a nationalistic bent. They view their respective countries as embodiments of either Han Chinese or Hindu civilization, where the center of the world revolves around their nations in the sense that they see them as the center of history.

Read Here – The American Conservative

China-India Border Dispute Fuelled By Rise In Nationalism On Both Sides

A fresh dispute with Indiaover their long border in the desolate mountains of the Himalayas has created a new dilemma for China to go with its intensifying rivalry with the United States and international backlash against its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Beijing risks pushing New Delhi further into the American camp, analysts have warned, if the current border face-off continues to drag on and spirals into another protracted stand-off like the Doklam row three years ago.

A Global COVID-19 Exit Strategy

The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented threat to both public health and the global economy. Only by ditching nationalist rhetoric and policies, and embracing stronger international cooperation, can governments protect the people they claim to represent.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The World’s Most Valuable Troublemakers

Every day, journalists go to press with stories that could endanger them and their families, understanding that the repercussions might be severe, even a matter of life and death. They are the sentries protecting the values of truth, accountability, and justice. These values are under attack. In an age of growing authoritarianism and repression of freedom and democracy, the very notion of facts and fairness is being called into question.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Rise of Nationalism After the Fall Of The Berlin Wall

Following the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, open societies were triumphant and international cooperation became the dominant creed. Thirty years later, however, nationalism has turned out to be much more powerful and disruptive than internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Netanyahu Brought Nationalism To The 21st Century

Benjamin Netanyahu has been at the front line of Israeli debate since the 1980s, but this week he faces the prospect of political mortality, with parliamentary elections leaving open the very real possibility that his time in office might be over. Yet whether or not he retains his post, whether or not he ever really believed the things he said—supporters of his argue that for “Bibi,” the nationalist rhetoric has always been a vehicle, not a core belief—his efforts have been emulated the world over by right-wing populists.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Today’s Nationalism Is Bad For Business

Multilateralism and global cooperation are under increasing threat, posing a serious risk to future prosperity. Business and finance leaders should care deeply about this state of affairs, so why aren’t they doing much more to help counter it?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Springtime For Nationalism?

Is populism still on the rise? That question will be looming over elections in Israel, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Spain, and the European Union over the next two months. Yet it will be misplaced, for the real contest is between nationalism and internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Europe And The New Imperialism

For decades, Europe has served as a steward of the post-war liberal order, ensuring that economic rules are enforced and that national ambitions are subordinated to shared goals within multilateral bodies. But with the United States and China increasingly mixing economics with nationalist foreign-policy agendas, Europe will have to adapt.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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