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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “nationalism”

The Rise of Nationalism After the Fall Of The Berlin Wall

Following the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, open societies were triumphant and international cooperation became the dominant creed. Thirty years later, however, nationalism has turned out to be much more powerful and disruptive than internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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Netanyahu Brought Nationalism To The 21st Century

Benjamin Netanyahu has been at the front line of Israeli debate since the 1980s, but this week he faces the prospect of political mortality, with parliamentary elections leaving open the very real possibility that his time in office might be over. Yet whether or not he retains his post, whether or not he ever really believed the things he said—supporters of his argue that for “Bibi,” the nationalist rhetoric has always been a vehicle, not a core belief—his efforts have been emulated the world over by right-wing populists.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Today’s Nationalism Is Bad For Business

Multilateralism and global cooperation are under increasing threat, posing a serious risk to future prosperity. Business and finance leaders should care deeply about this state of affairs, so why aren’t they doing much more to help counter it?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Springtime For Nationalism?

Is populism still on the rise? That question will be looming over elections in Israel, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Spain, and the European Union over the next two months. Yet it will be misplaced, for the real contest is between nationalism and internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Europe And The New Imperialism

For decades, Europe has served as a steward of the post-war liberal order, ensuring that economic rules are enforced and that national ambitions are subordinated to shared goals within multilateral bodies. But with the United States and China increasingly mixing economics with nationalist foreign-policy agendas, Europe will have to adapt.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

A Better Populism

The only policy that left- and right-wing populists can agree on to address economic decline is trade protectionism, which will make the world poorer. A new type of populism that puts more trust in local communities may well have a greater chance of success.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Why Nationalism Works

Nationalism has a bad reputation today. It is, in the minds of many educated Westerners, a dangerous ideology. Some acknowledge the virtues of patriotism, understood as the benign affection for one’s homeland; at the same time, they see nationalism as narrow-minded and immoral, promoting blind loyalty to a country over deeper commitments to justice and humanity.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

If The U.S. Doesn’t Control Corporate Power, China Will

As the consensus in D.C. shifts toward taking on an increasingly aggressive China, ideas about how corporations relate to the state will also have to change—or else undermine their new stated national framework.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

We Are All Globalnationalists Now

In the epilogue to the first volume of his biography of Henry Kissinger, The Idealist, historian Niall Fergusson notes that he asked Yale university professor, John Gaddis, whether he agreed with his designation of Dr K. as a foreign policy “idealist.” That assessment contrasted with the conventional view of the former U.S. Secretary of State as archetypal national security “realist,” the kind who hangs a picture of Otto von Bismarck in his study.

Read Here – The Spectator

Making India Great Again?

File photo of Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressing an ASEAN Business and Investment Summit in Malaysia.

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi is merely the champion of a larger movement that seeks to push India in a more nationalist direction.

Read Here – The National Interest

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