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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “nationalists”

Could 1989 Have Led to Democracy In China?

There are two great “what if” questions in modern Chinese history. The first was in 1949, which is when China fell to the Communists. What if the Nationalists had been more effective on the battlefield? What if the United States had given them more support? What if Chiang Kai-Shek had won the civil war instead of being exiled to Taiwan? What if?… The second great “what if” is 1989, and it’s much more important. It’s when China almost turned toward democracy.

Read Here – The National Interest

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Nationalists And Globalists

Feelings of being disconnected and despised, however, are powerful emotions, strong enough to twist facts into a dark alternate reality. It is critical to look beyond a simple story of populism, of masses versus elites.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

All Around The World, Nationalists Are Gaining Ground. Why?

All societies draw on nationalism of one sort or another to define relations between the state, the citizen and the outside world. Craig Calhoun, an American sociologist, argues that cosmopolitan elites, who sometimes yearn for a post-nationalist order, underestimate “how central nationalist categories are to political and social theory—and to practical reasoning about democracy, political legitimacy and the nature of society itself.”

Read Here – The Economist

In United States, It’s Nationalists Vs Globalists

Any true understanding of this election requires an appreciation of the one huge political fault line that is driving America into a period of serious political tremors, certain to jolt the political Richter scale. It is nationalists vs. globalists.

Read Here – The National Interest

Destructive Equilibrium

How did India and Pakistan arrive at this equilibrium? The answer starts, of course, in Kashmir, which has always been the primary point of contention between the two countries. Unfortunately, the Kashmir question is unlikely to be answered soon. While territorial disputes between states are usually bitter and persistent – states usually perceive competition over territory as a winner take all, zero sum proposition – Kashmir presents a particularly difficult case.

Read Here – The Diplomat

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