Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Nepal”

The China – India – Nepal Triangle

China wants to invest in big connectivity projects in Nepal but prefers to bring its Asian competitor, India, on board. Some Nepali and Chinese scholars see this as an opportunity for trilateral cooperation between Nepal, India, and China, but Indian policymakers and academics have not shown much interest.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Advertisements

India And China Jostle For Influence in Iran And Central Asia

China and India’s new Great Game has reached the playing field of the original imperial power rivalry in the 19th century: Iran and Central Asia. Each of the rising giants wants to be the one to shape a new regional order. Their competition for influence continues to unfold in Indian Ocean countries like the Maldives and Sri Lanka. But they are also pressing farther west, up into the Arabian Sea, Iran and the Central Asian states.

Read Here – Nikkei Asian Review

Also Read: Rising Power Of India’s influence On China in Regional Politics

Nepal PM Oli’s Visit To Delhi Signals A New Equilibrium

Both domestic politics and regional dynamics have changed appreciably since Oli last visited New Delhi in 2016 when Nepal was under an undeclared border blockade by India. India felt slighted that Nepal’s major political parties, including Oli’s Communist Party of Nepal-Marxist Leninist (CPN-UML), had failed to take New Delhi in confidence about the content of the new constitution. Nepal’s leaders, on the other hand, insisted that it was Nepal’s internal affair.

Read Here – The Indian Express

India Sounds Alarm On Chinese Infra Projects In Neighbourhood

In a candid assessment, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale said that China was “making headway” in infrastructure projects in South Asia and its “far greater” capacity to take up these undertakings are a “constant concern” for India. Gokhale’s remarks were made to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on External Affairs at a hearing on February 16. These were reproduced in the latest report of the standing committee on the Ministry of External Affairs’ budget, which was tabled last week.

Read Here – The Wire

Nepal’s Main Political Actors Must Admit That The New Constitution Is A Failure.

Nepal can either continue to be governed by a failed constitution, with the rulers using it the way they want. Or the leaders of three parties can give up on their egos and chart out a conciliatory roadmap. For this to happen, they need to admit that they bungled all the opportunities in the past 11 years. But unlike on the previous occasions, they have to find a way out in Nepali territory, involving all internal forces genuinely and seriously.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Grading India’s Neighbourhood Diplomacy

India’s rise is taking place in the shadow of China’s even more dramatic rise. China’s assertive, and often aggressive, behaviour has been viewed as a huge challenge for India because it opens up the likelihood of China dominating India’s immediate neighbourhood. By focusing a great deal of energy in the neighbourhood, the Modi government is demonstrating that India has the capability to promote regional peace and economic integration.

Read Here – The Diplomat

An Election In Nepal, Decades In The Making

Addressing the legacies of Nepal’s past won’t be easy with the massive challenges that lie ahead: deep-seated political rivalries; ethnic, class, and regional divisions; and a lack of justice for victims of war crimes. But attempting to simply move forward won’t make them go away; it will ensure that they bring greater problems down the road.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Indian Posturing, Post-Doklam, Has A Tragi-Comic Feel

The real lesson, therefore, that India should learn from the Doklam standoff is that it shouldn’t draw wrong conclusions. The BRICS Summit in Xiamen is not to be mistaken as a “kiss-and-make-up” moment. Deep down, India has a choice to make and China is watching closely. Should the Modi government go further down the road of trespassing into China’s core interests in the South China Sea, raking up Tibet-related issues and identifying with the United States’ containment strategy against China?

Read Here – Asia Times

Also Read: Why India Did Not ‘Win’ The Standoff With China

Nepal Torn Both Ways As Stand-Off Between India And China Continues

A senior Chinese official’s visit to Nepal next week will highlight the dilemma faced by the Himalayan country amid the ongoing standoff between its two giant neighbours China and India. Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang’s four-day official visit to Kathmandu, starting on August 14, will come at a sensitive time as Beijing and New Delhi are at loggerheads over a protracted military standoff in the Himalayan Doklam plateau.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Calling The Chinese Bully’s Bluff

The more power China has accumulated, the more it has attempted to achieve its foreign-policy objectives with bluff, bluster, and bullying. But, as its Himalayan border standoff with India’s military continues, the limits of this approach are becoming increasingly apparent.

Read Here – Project-Syndicate

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: