looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “OBOR”

The Pakistan Army’s Belt And Road Putsch

For Pakistan, the renewed emphasis on CPEC and the growing role for the Army are double-edged swords. In the short term, paired together, they will inject much-needed aid and investment into the Pakistani economy. And a tighter embrace with China will bolster Pakistan’s security against arch-rival India. But, in the long term…

Read Here – Foreign Policy

China Can Buy Influence, But It Can’t Buy Love

If it’s going to compete with the United States for superpower status, it will have to match America’s soft power… But China has a distinct disadvantage: It’s not as attractive as America. Few people around the world voluntarily listen to Chinese songs, watch Chinese television, use Chinese slang (or any Chinese words), or dress like the Chinese people they see on TV.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Belt And Road Re-Emerges in Pakistan With Flurry Of China Deals

China’s Belt and Road program has found new life in Pakistan with $11 billion worth of projects signed in the last month, driven by a former lieutenant general who has reinvigorated the infrastructure plan that’s been languishing since Prime Minister Imran Khan took office two years ago.

Read Here – Bloomberg

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Has Trapped China’s Belt And Road Initiative Between A Rock And A Hard Place

Either Beijing will find innovative ways that benefit debtor nations or it will be seen as just another predatory lender in a long history of empire builders. The backlash to China’s presence in lands around the world will soon follow, along with fractured political and economic relationships that become difficult, if not impossible, to mend.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China Wants To Put Itself Back At The Centre Of The World

On China’s border with Kazakhstan, a new Silk Road city has sprung up with such speed that Google Earth has scarcely begun to record the high-rises that now float on a winter mist above the steppe…Khorgos has become China’s gateway to Central Asia, and all the way to Europe.

Read Here – The Economist

China, Myanmar Tighten Their Belt And Road Ties

China and Myanmar agreed to accelerate several joint infrastructure deals and projects during President Xi Jinping’s historic visit to the country, giving new impetus to commercial relations that have revived under Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Xi visited Myanmar on January 17 and 18, marking the first time a Chinese leader traveled to the Southeast Asian country in nearly two decades and coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the two sides establishing formal diplomatic relations.

Read Here – Asia Times

China’s Investments The Least Popular Of Its Diplomacy Efforts In South And Central Asia

China’s attempts to woo South and Central Asian countries with a total of US$126 billion of investment in 17 years have proved the most polarising of its efforts to gain regional influence, because of concerns over debt traps, transparency and Chinese labour, according to research in the United States.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Where China Isn’t Sending Its Best And Brightest

In this sense, China is acting like the colonialists of old: For nearly a century, Britain, first through the East India Company and then under the Crown, exported its own mediocre men to supposedly civilize the South Asian Raj, contributing to the Empire’s impotence and eventual fall. Today, China is ultimately undermining its efforts to become the globe’s foremost power by shipping abroad its own middling ruralites.

Read Here – Washington Monthly

The Awkward Elephant In The Room When Xi And Modi Meet

File Photo/PIB

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to India next month might look like a landmark moment in the warming of relations between the two countries. But look a little closer and one seemingly intractable obstacle remains: Xi’s signature

Belt and Road Initiative. The plan remains a thorny issue in relations.

How China Can Offer Pakistan A Path From The Precipice

Introduced under considerable fanfare in 2015, CPEC provides much-needed financing for infrastructure and energy pipelines that Pakistan could not entice other investors to underwrite. However, the expected payoff is unlikely to compensate for the sizable risks to which these investments expose the Pakistani economy.

Read Here – RealClearWorld

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