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Archive for the tag “oil”

Russians Grapple With Oil Price War At A Time Of Pandemic

The timing could not have been worse for Russia to provoke a spat with Saudi Arabia over oil production quotas in early March. Moscow’s decision to withdraw from the OPEC+ agreement restricting oil production in order to maintain higher oil prices triggered a harsh reaction by Riyadh that sent oil prices spiralling down to below $25 per barrel in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read Here – Eurasia Daily Monitor

$10/Barrel Oil Is Possible: Can American Energy Independence Survive The 2020 Oil War?

President Trump has suggested America still has “a lot of power over the situation” and could yet find a middle ground. The U.S. leader will need all his famed dealmaking ability and more though to pull off what could be a deal of the century with Saudi Arabia, to keep U.S. energy independence and the shale industry alive.

Read Here – The National Interest

Kremlin Confident It Can Win Oil Price War

Despite the shock fall in oil prices, Russian officials remain confident that stepping away from the OPEC deal was a wise decision and largely blame their OPEC partner for refusing to reach a compromise. According to an official statement, the Russian side offered to preserve the production cuts already in place until the second half of 2020 “in order to better understand the impact of the coronavirus on the global economy and oil demand.” However, the statement continues, “our OPEC partners decided to increase oil production and start a fight for market share.”

Read Here – Asia Times

Oil Takes Biggest Daily Dive In Over A Decade As Russia, OPEC Split

The split between OPEC and Russia revived fears of a 2014 oil price crash, when Saudi Arabia and Russia fought for market share with U.S. shale oil producers, which have never participated in output-limiting pacts. OPEC was pushing for an additional 1.5 million barrels per day (bpd) of cuts until the end of 2020.

Read Here –  Reuters

Perpetual Chaos: Why the Middle East Has Been Marred By America’s Presence

If there is any lesson to be learned from three decades of American interventions, it is that the politics of foreign lands are far too complicated for an outside superpower to intervene and not produce costly unintended consequences.

Read Here – The National Interest

Striking Oil Ain’t What It Used To Be

At a time when many countries are finally trying to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels, the world is suddenly awash in oil and gas discoveries. But for the countries with the newest finds, many of them in Africa and South America, mineral wealth may not be the bonanza it was in decades past.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Chastened Kingdom

On December 1, Saudi Arabia officially assumed the presidency of the G-20. The task of leading the high-profile economic forum, which rotates annually among member countries, is usually more a matter of form than of substance. But for Saudi Arabia—the group’s only Arab member—the stakes are high.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

How The Energy World Of Tomorrow Reshapes Geopolitics

To understand geopolitics we need to understand power, which in turn derives from the perception of national wealth. The way nation-states use their wealth to defend their interests helps to shape our perception of their place and their role in the world. Soil resources are among the most important elements of wealth. But it is the human being who evaluates those elements — as such, the human resource is superior to them.

Read Here – RealClearWorld

The U.S. Dominates New Oil And Gas Production

The American fracking for oil and natural gas boom will continue on through the 2020s. And why not? Since fracking took off in 2008, the U.S. has more than doubled our proven oil reserves to ~65 billion barrels. Natural gas reserves have surged over 80% to ~430 trillion cubic feet. Already the largest oil and gas producer, the U.S. is set to increase its share of ~17% of global oil production and ~23% of gas. In the 2020s, the U.S. is set to supply over 60% of new oil and gas.

Read Here – Forbes

Mohammed bin Salman Is Having a Fire Sale Of His Political Power

The two most important facts about Aramco are now directly in tension with one another. It has been central to the power of the House of Saud precisely because the royal family has had it under tight control. At the same time, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has made it central to his plan to transform the country, known as Vision 2030, by promising to sell shares of the company to investors—thus giving them greater control over it.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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