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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Pakistan”

Why Imran Khan Bats For Narendra Modi

The general sense is that with Modi at the helm of affairs, war and conflict will mark the tone of relations between the two countries. However, this would be beneficial for Pakistan’s nationalist project that gets strengthened with every news of mob lynching of Muslims and other minorities, from India. This is not to argue that the state of minorities in Pakistan is any better: But New Delhi no longer represents a secular ideal. For Islamabad, a non-secular India is easier to contest.

Read Here – The Indian Express

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Better Chance Of Peace Talks With India If PM Narendra Modi Wins, Says Imran Khan

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan said he thinks there may be a better chance of peace talks with India if Prime Minister Narendra Modi wins the 2019 Lok Sabha polls due to begin on Thursday. Khan said that if the next Indian government were led by the opposition Congress party, it might be too scared to seek a settlement with Pakistan over Kashmir, fearing a backlash from the right.

Read Here – India Today

Pakistan Summons Envoy Claiming India Planning ‘New Action’; New Delhi Calls It ‘War Hysteria’

Pakistan on Sunday claimed India was planning new “action” between April 16 and 20, and summoned the Indian deputy high commissioner Gaurav Ahluwalia and issued a demarche warning New Delhi “against any misadventure”. Responding to the issue, the Ministry of External Affairs said, “India rejects the irresponsible and preposterous statement by the Foreign Minister of Pakistan with a clear objective of whipping up war hysteria in the region.” 

Read Here – The Indian Express

A Smouldering Volcano: Pakistan And Terrorism After Balakot

Although propitious political circumstances made the Balakot crisis between India and Pakistan manageable, Pakistani terrorism remains the principal continuing threat to stability in South Asia. U.S. policy moving forward must relentlessly pressure Pakistan to crack down on jihadi groups or risk continuing crises in the region.

Read Here – Carnegie Endowment For International Peace

The Real Border Crisis

Though India and Pakistan’s exchange of fire late last month did not trigger a wider aggression, tensions remain dangerously high. Worse, larger historical and political forces all but ensure that the region will remain on tenterhooks.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

China Walks Fine Line As India Calls On United Nations To Impose Anti-Terrorist Sanctions On Pakistani Militant Leader

A senior Chinese diplomat said China and Pakistan will defend their core interests as India called on Beijing and the other four permanent members of the UN Security Council to place a Pakistani militant leader on a counterterrorist sanctions list. Deputy foreign minister Kong Xuanyou stated China’s position at meetings with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa and Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi in Islamabad…

Read Here – South China Morning Post

India And Pakistan On The Brink: A Nuclear Nightmare In Southeast Asia

Recent studies have estimated that regional nuclear war, such as one between India and Pakistan, could lead to the deaths of some 2 billion people worldwide. To prevent this nightmare from becoming a reality, the international community must condemn further acts of violence and build space for the conflict to be mediated, before the situation escalates further out of hand.

Read Here – The National Interest

India’s China Problem In Pakistan

The deadly terrorist attack in Jammu and Kashmir last month has triggered renewed questions about China’s continued protection of the Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed. Will China continue to block international sanctions against JeM’s leader, Maulana Masood Azhar, who has claimed credit for the attack?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Next India-Pakistan Crisis Will Be Worse

With India and Pakistan having demonstrated they are comfortable engaging in increasingly provocative uses of military force under the nuclear umbrella, they will have an incentive in the future to go up a few more rungs on the escalatory ladder to try to achieve goals that couldn’t be achieved further down that ladder. Regardless of whether they succeed or fail, this much is true: With both sides now willing to climb higher up the escalation ladder, a future nuclear exchange could become a far less remote prospect.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Road From The Brink

One military episode cannot, by itself, decisively change the trajectory of one of modern history’s longest-running conflicts. But, as both sides — India and Pakistan — signal temporary de-escalation, it might be worth revisiting the historical and psychological dynamics that constitute the present moment.

Read Here – The Indian Express

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