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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “population”

How India’s Battle With Climate Change Could Determine All Of Our Fates

Of all the most polluting nations – US, China, Russia, Japan and the EU bloc – only India’s carbon emissions are rising: they rose almost 5% in 2016. No one questions India’s right to develop, or the fact that its current emissions per person are tiny. But when building the new India for its 1.3 billion people, whether it relies on coal and oil or clean, green energy will be a major factor in whether global warming can be tamed.

Read Here – The Guardian

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Seven Things We Learned About China In September

While everyone is talking about face recognition on new phones, China is already developing some surprising applications for this technology such as smiling to pay for your meal, using your face and your voice to access your residence hall at university, enforcing social norms by, for example, naming and shaming jaywalkers, and catching criminals on their day off.

Read Here – World Economic Forum

The Human Dimensions Of Climate Change In Asia And The Pacific

6 Numbers That Prove The Future Is African

By 2030 one in five people will be African. Combine the continent’s soaring population with technology, improvements in infrastructure, health and education, and Africa could be the next century’s economic growth powerhouse.

Read Here – World Economic Forum

Let’s Get Real About What Ails Japan’s Economy

A quarter of a century of failure and economic stagnation has built a strong consensus on what ails Japan. All sources of analysis—domestic, foreign, government, corporate and nonprofit—identify two problems: the country’s aging demographics and its deeply entrenched, top-down approach to economic organization. This analysis is wrong.

Read Here – The National Interest

China’s Self-Inflicted Demographic Disaster Is Here

The liberalization of the one-child policy had been expected—and virtually inevitable. China, after all, is heading toward accelerated demographic decline. The country’s population is now projected to peak in 2028, well before the 2030–2035 timeframe expected just a half decade ago. In all probability, the top will be reached earlier, maybe in 2020.

Read Here – The National Interest

A Global Middle Class Is More Promise than Reality

The first decade of this century witnessed an historic reduction in global poverty and a near doubling of the number of people who could be considered middle income. But the emergence of a truly global middle class is still more promise than reality.

Read Here – Pew Research

Violence And The Rising Number Of Refugees

According to theannual Global Peace Index report, released on Wednesday, there are more than 50 million refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs) around the globe right now. Put another way, that’s one in every 133 people worldwide and 0.75 percent of the world population. Put yet another way, that’s roughly the equivalent of the entire population of South Korea being pushed out of their homes, or as if the combined populations of Australia and Taiwan had to leave.

Read Here – The Atlantic

India Rising, China Slowing Doesn’t Mean Modi Wins

Statistics bear out China’s global dominance. Since Deng abandoned doctrinaire communism in 1978, growth has surged an average of 9.8 percent annually. Since 2001, China has overtaken Italy, the U.K., France, Germany, and Japan to become the world’s second-biggest economy. Its $10 trillion GDP dwarfs India’s $2 trillion. Not only has China built the world’s biggest stockpile of foreign reserves, at $3.7 trillion; the country also accounts for one-third of the global total and boasts 10 times India’s amount. Even O’Neill acknowledges the imbalance: “If India grows by 8 percent for the rest of this decade and China grows by 7 percent, China will still create another three Indias before the decade is over.”

Read Here – Bloomberg

Shrinking China: A Demographic Crisis

…Unfortunately for the Chinese, their country’s population is about to peak and then shrink fast. Fewer people may not necessarily mean less power, but a shriveling population requires the country’s leadership to overcome demographic trends rather than be propelled by them, as it has since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949.

Read Here – World Affairs Journal

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