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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “ports”

Gwadar, Chabahar And Dubai

By far, Gwadar is a decade ahead of Chabahar in terms of development and higher brand recognition among the maritime industry. Iran’s belligerent security posturing and interventionist policies of harbouring non-state actors in Muslim countries constantly put her at the risk of war as well as sanctions. Chabahar is and continues to be a fishing port and does not match Gwadar, which is a natural harbour and the deepest in Asia, with little need for continuous dredging.

Read Here – The Express Tribune

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How China Rules The Waves

Investments into a vast network of harbours across the globe have made Chinese port operators the world leaders. Its shipping companies carry more cargo than those of any other nation — five of the top 10 container ports in the world are in mainland China with another in Hong Kong. Its coastguard has the globe’s largest maritime law enforcement fleet, its navy is the world’s fastest growing among major powers and its fishing armada numbers some 200,000 seagoing vessels.

Read Here – Financial Times

Pakistan And The Hidden Costs Of The CPEC

Nobody doubts that CPEC carries tremendous promise for Pakistan. And nobody doubts that our security forces have made major sacrifices in the war on terror, as well as facing the looming threat from a belligerent India these days. But greater transparency is needed in the financing of CPEC projects. Otherwise, hidden costs of all sorts will start getting bundled into whatever recovery machinery there is, whether power tariffs of gas surcharges or whatever else.

Read Here – Dawn

Sri Lanka’s China Enclave: Set To Boom Or Bust?

Hambantota isn’t just a place in Sri Lanka, it’s a symbol. What started out as a gargantuan project to transform an undeveloped swath of Sri Lankan jungle into the country’s number two city — an industrial and logistical epicenter in the heart of the Indian Ocean — turned into a metaphor for opaque government dealings, poor planning, the flippant use of public funds, and token rivalries between political factions.

Read Here – Forbes

One Year On, The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

It has just been over a year since Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) during his inaugural state visit to Pakistan in April 2015. What has been the progress of the construction of the megaproject since then?

Read Here – Eurasia Review

China Defends Submarine Sales To Pakistan

In terms of military strength, the Indian Navy has two aircraft carriers in service and is building a new indigenous one. It has 15 submarines, almost twice that of Pakistan.  More importantly, India’s domestically developed nuclear-powered submarine, INS Arihant, has undergone several sea trials and will soon enter service. New Delhi is also planning at least six more nuclear-powered submarines. In comparison, it will take eight to 10 years for Pakistan to incorporate the eight submarines from China into its combat capacity. It will be extremely hard to break the military balance of India and Pakistan with the latest acquisition. Pakistan is actually trying to prevent the gap between its naval strength and India’s from widening, argues Qian Feng.

Read Here – Global Times

India-Australia Drills Targeting Submarines Rattle China

India and Australia will focus on anti-submarine warfare in their first ever joint naval exercises, signaling a growing strategic relationship to counter China’s increased activity in the Indian Ocean.

Read Here – Bloomberg

How China Could Become A Two-Ocean Power (Thanks to Pakistan)

China’s interest in deepening its involvement in Pakistan is nothing new. What has changed and has enabled the Chinese to intensify their focus on Pakistan, is the effective end of the West’s, and in particular the United States’, military operations in Afghanistan in 2015. Accordingly, NATO’s departure from Afghanistan has had two consequences: it has created a regional power vacuum and it has diminished America’s interest in Pakistan. And China has quickly jumped into the breach.

Read Here – The National Interest

Speculation Over China’s Ties With Sri Lanka Premture?

Competition between China and India in Sri Lanka is not exclusive or confrontational. All sides have learned to keep the necessary restraint in politically interfering with competition in the economic sector.
As to whether China has been too aggressive in pushing investment in Sri Lanka, the answer will lie in the development of the bilateral relationship in future years. As long as political development in Colombo is logical, China’s investment will not be in vain.

Read Here – Global Times

 

A Chinese Proposal India Can Say No To?

According to a report in India’s Economic Times, China has offered to finance a large portion of India’s infrastructure development via loans.  The investment would amount to 30 percent of India’s planned infrastructure spending through 2017. For comparison, China contributed a mere 0.15 percent of India’s total FDI inflows between April 2000 and December 2013. India has in the past refused Chinese investment in critical infrastructure, particularly telecom and power, over national security concerns.

Read Here – The Diplomat

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