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Archive for the tag “Richard Nixon”

The Return Of The Madman Theory

Is Donald Trump reviving the “madman theory” of diplomacy, introduced by Richard Nixon to instill fear in America’s adversaries? North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s description of Trump as “mentally deranged” suggests that such a ploy might be working – or else Kim is more right than he, or the rest of us, would like.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Things Don’t End Well For Madmen

Donald Trump has repeatedly emphasized the value of being “unpredictable,” and has established a pattern of firing off ill-conceived threats that do make him appear slightly unhinged. His apparent hope is that this sort of behavior will persuade both allies and adversaries will do his bidding, for fear that this irrational and impulsive man will fly off the handle and do something terrible. In other words, Trump appears to subscribe to the so-called madman theory of diplomacy.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

The Drunk Policeman Who Brought Down A President

What does it take to bring down a president and change the world? Sometimes years of collective action, planning and organizing; sometimes it’s as simple as one man doing nothing one night in a local bar.

Read Here – Ozy

America Needs A Corporate Foreign Policy

Make no mistake: American foreign policy has indeed failed. It failed to prevent the rise of a peer competitor such as China, failed to entrench democracy in Arab and Latin American transition societies, and failed to integrate regional powers such as Russia and Iran into a liberal order. Barack Obama came into office seeking to change course from George W. Bush, but reluctantly remained a wartime president.

Read Here – Politico

Why Saudi 2030 Isn’t Iran 1963

On the surface, the similarities between 1960s Iran and modern Saudi Arabia seem self-explanatory. Like Saudi Arabia today, Iran in the Pahlavi era was ruled by a monarchy with a close (but complicated) relationship with the United States. Indeed, Tehran and Riyadh would go on to become the “twin pillars” of Nixon’s strategy for keeping the Soviets out of the Middle East.

Read Here – The National Interest

What China Could Learn From Richard Nixon

Downshifting is always painful, but politicians often make it more painful—and ultimately more destabilising—than it needs to be. That was certainly the case in the U.S. in the 1970s, and Chinese leaders would do well to learn from America’s experience.

Read Here – The Atlantic

China Wants Great Power, Not Great Responsibility

Forty-three years after Richard Nixon made his famous visit to China, that country has seemingly decided to take a page from the former U.S. president’s Treasury Department. As China lowers the value of the yuan, the country’s economic policy makers are mimicking the blasé attitude of Nixon-era Treasury chief John Connally, who dismissed international complaints about U.S. monetary policy with a curt remark: “It’s our currency, but it’s your problem.”

Read Here – Bloomberg

Can China Be Contained?

U.S. foreign policy has reached a turning point, as analysts from across the political spectrum have started to dust off Cold War-era arguments and to speak of the need for a policy of containment against China. The once solid Washington consensus behind the benefits of “constructive engagement” with Beijing has fallen apart.

Read Here – Wall Street Journal

A Living Legacy

Though (Henry) Kissinger has come under attack from liberal circles—among the more notable assaults are Seymour Hersh’s The Price of Power, Christopher Hitchens’s The Trial of Henry Kissinger and, most recently, Gary J. Bass’s The Blood Telegram—he has also regularly incurred the ire of conservatives. Throughout the 1970s, he was steadily denounced as deaf to human-rights concerns on the one hand, and as an appeaser on the other.

Read Here – National Interest

A Workable Legacy For Obama

U.S. President Barack Obama has a good chance of making peace with Iran and lave behind an enduring foreign policy legacy just as one of his predecessors, Richard Nixon, opened the doors to China. Obama could learn from Nixon the art of perseverance and tenacity in developing better relations with an old foe. But let’s also remember that the world Nixon lived in was very different than the one Obama presides upon.

Read More – Aljazeera

Obama speaking with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

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