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Archive for the tag “Russia”

Russians Grapple With Oil Price War At A Time Of Pandemic

The timing could not have been worse for Russia to provoke a spat with Saudi Arabia over oil production quotas in early March. Moscow’s decision to withdraw from the OPEC+ agreement restricting oil production in order to maintain higher oil prices triggered a harsh reaction by Riyadh that sent oil prices spiralling down to below $25 per barrel in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read Here – Eurasia Daily Monitor

$10/Barrel Oil Is Possible: Can American Energy Independence Survive The 2020 Oil War?

President Trump has suggested America still has “a lot of power over the situation” and could yet find a middle ground. The U.S. leader will need all his famed dealmaking ability and more though to pull off what could be a deal of the century with Saudi Arabia, to keep U.S. energy independence and the shale industry alive.

Read Here – The National Interest

Kremlin Confident It Can Win Oil Price War

Despite the shock fall in oil prices, Russian officials remain confident that stepping away from the OPEC deal was a wise decision and largely blame their OPEC partner for refusing to reach a compromise. According to an official statement, the Russian side offered to preserve the production cuts already in place until the second half of 2020 “in order to better understand the impact of the coronavirus on the global economy and oil demand.” However, the statement continues, “our OPEC partners decided to increase oil production and start a fight for market share.”

Read Here – Asia Times

Oil Takes Biggest Daily Dive In Over A Decade As Russia, OPEC Split

The split between OPEC and Russia revived fears of a 2014 oil price crash, when Saudi Arabia and Russia fought for market share with U.S. shale oil producers, which have never participated in output-limiting pacts. OPEC was pushing for an additional 1.5 million barrels per day (bpd) of cuts until the end of 2020.

Read Here –  Reuters

What Now After The U.S.-Taliban Deal

It took the Trump administration 17 months to clinch a preliminary agreement with the Taliban – a first step toward ending more than 18 years of U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan. The deal is not so much a peace agreement as it is a way for Washington to manage conflict in the southwest Asian nation in the aftermath of the American withdrawal, which is supposed to be finalized by May 2020 (assuming the Taliban uphold their end of the bargain).

Read Here – Centre For Global Policy

The New Spheres Of Influence

Unipolarity is over, and with it the illusion that other nations would simply take their assigned place in a U.S.-led international order. For the United States, that will require accepting the reality that there are spheres of influence in the world today—and that not all of them are American spheres.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Balkan Great Game

The Great Game, a prolonged 19th century confrontation between the British and Russian empires in Central Asia, is often invoked as a prime example of the struggle for influence between major powers. But another Great Game was played out at that time in the Balkans between Russia and several European powers when the Ottoman empire began to retreat. We are now witnessing the 21st century version of the Balkan Great Game, but where Moscow relies on subversion and deception as it cannot compete militarily or economically with the West.

Read Here – CEPA

In Central Asia, Can China Really Compete With Russia?

For Russia, maintaining influence in the post-Soviet Central Asian states is critical. These countries form a key buffer zone for Russia, separating the country from unstable areas of the Middle East and terrorist elements. Russia is concerned that terrorist and extremist influences could spread to its southern border and into the Caucasus through Central Asia and threaten to destabilize its southern and eastern regions.

Read Here – Geopolitical Futures

Turkey Is No Ally Of The United States

Trump defends his greenlighting of Turkey’s invasion of northern Syria by attesting to the importance of Turkey as an ally. It is time he join the increasingly rare bipartisan consensus in Congress to ask whether if Turkey is an ally, then how would its actions be different if it were an adversary?

Read Here – The National Interest

What Drives Chinese Arms Sales In Central Asia?

Indeed, with the collapse of a purported Sino-Russian economic-military division of labor, a growing economic interest in Central Asia as a main corridor in the Belt and Road Initiative, and an on-going anti-Uyghur separatist discourse, Central Asia is an obvious choice for a Chinese foreign military base.

Read Here – The Diplomat

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