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foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “sanctions”

How Sanctions Feed Authoritarianism

The United States has a long history of intervening overseas to solve one problem and inadvertently creating others. In the 1980s, the Reagan administration armed rebels fighting Afghanistan’s Soviet-backed government only to find that some of them later targeted the United States…It’s worth remembering these precedents as the Trump administration prepares to reimpose sanctions on Iran as part of its withdrawal from the 2015 nuclear deal.

Read Here – The Atlantic

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Kim, The Economy And Why UN Sanctions Did Not Bring North Korea To The Summit Table

If top officials in Washington and Tokyo are to be believed, the application of “maximum pressure” through United Nations sanctions was decisive in bringing North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to the summit table.  Pyongyang has been the target of a string of UN bans from trade to travel for more than a decade, the toughest coming in September when they were expanded to cover crude oil. Just six months later Kim sent a message offering to meet US President Donald Trump with no strings attached.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Iran Deal Was Bad, But Leaving It Was Worse

The damage from withdrawing from the JCPOA is also increased by Trump’s abandonment of the serious effort to develop a common position between the U.S. and its European allies on the so called “sunset clause.” That clause would have allowed Iran to regain it’s so called “inalienable rights” to scale up its worrisome nuclear activities within a few years and therefore needed addressing.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Complicated Geopolitics Of U.S. Oil Sanctions On Iran

It is often said, perhaps with some hyperbole, that Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers was the best hope for conflict resolution in the Middle East. Its architect John Kerry argues instead that the 2015 deal’s limited parameter of closing Iran’s pathway to a nuclear weapon is sufficient on the merits.

Read Here – CFR

Trump’s China Deal Is The Worst Ever

If nothing further is done, the U.S.-China trade deal reached this month will be remembered, to quote a phrase coined by the current president of the United States, as “the single worst trade deal” ever negotiated.

Read Here – CFR

Breaking A Big Deal

We are left with a region where the Iranians and Saudis will have no more opportunities to cooperate to resolve regional crises, starting with those in Syria and Yemen. Which means, that in the near future, the US, the Europeans and other parties involved in the geo-political game of the Middle East will be left with a difficult choice: Military action against Iran and its proxies, or living with a nuclear-armed hegemonic Iran.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Why A Mystery Armoured Train Could Hold The Key To Kim Jong-Un’s Rumoured Visit To China

The mysterious armoured train that arrived in Beijing on Monday night is one of the main pieces of evidence to support the theory that Kim Jong-un is making a historic visit to China. While Beijing has yet to confirm Kim is in Beijing, the arrival of the train coupled with reports of heightened security at a state guest house and along the Chinese border with North Korea, all point towards a visit by a senior figure from Pyongyang.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read:

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un leaves Beijing after surprise visit

What Xi Jinping needs to hear from Kim Jong-un in China

Kim’s Nukes Aren’t a Bargaining Chip. They’re an Insurance Policy

North Korea looks pretty scary at the moment, firing off missile after missile, threatening to target Guam, and, on Sept. 3, testing what the regime claims was its first hydrogen bomb. And the country’s dictator, Kim Jong Un—so ruthless he may have had members of his own family murdered—might be just crazy enough to push the button to initiate a catastrophic war. Or maybe not.

Read Here – Bloomberg

The US Balance-of-Power Strategy In The Gulf Is Collapsing. But It Never Had A Chance Anyway

The ongoing dispute between Qatar and the rest of Arab Gulf Cooperation Council represents perhaps the greatest internal threat to the group since it was created as a bulwark against Shi’a radicalism in the aftermath of the 1979 Iranian revolution. The split all but eliminates any prospect that the United States could forge a regional – let alone an international – coalition to contain and roll back what many consider Iran’s growing regional clout.

Read Here – Defense One

For China’s Global Ambitions, ‘Iran Is At The Center Of Everything’

Once dependent on Beijing during the years of international isolation imposed by the West for its nuclear program, Iran is now critical to China’s ability to realize its grandiose ambitions. Other routes to Western markets are longer and lead through Russia, potentially a competitor of China.

Read Here – The New York Times

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