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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “science”

The Government Must Review What Bioresearch Journals Publish

The news that researchers have recreated an extinct cousin to the smallpox virus using only commercially available technology and items purchased over the Internet renews concerns that bioterrorists could do the same if detailed information about the methods were published.

Read Here – Defense One

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The Nerd Labs

Behind a lot of the technology we take for granted in our lives—the satellite mapping behind Google Maps, or the voice recognition software behind your iPhone’s Siri—lie not just inventive tech companies, but the sclerotic old federal government. Across the country, Washington funds a network of advanced—sometimes secret, often underappreciated—government laboratories dedicated to blue-sky, “what-the-hell” research at the frontiers of science and technology.

Read Here – Politico

Russia’s Quest To Build A Space Empire—Or Go Broke Trying

Roscosmos has a near monopoly on the Russian space industry. It encompasses more than 60 companies and 250,000 people. And in the spirit of collaboration, it is using those resources to do new things, like develop technology, Earth observation capacity, and communications systems for Vietnam, Venezuela, Brazil, Mexico, and Chile. Oh, and they are helping those countries develop their own experts—and space policies. In other words, Russia—in “helping”—is also shaping not just how the international space industry shapes up but also how it functions politically.

Read Here – Wired

This Is How China-U.S. Ties Pan Out…

– People’s Daily Online

For Asian Students, All Roads Lead To The United States

Despite bipartisan consensus in favor of retaining foreign students studying at U.S. universities to make America economically competitive, Congress continues to disagree over the details. Over the past couple of years, we have seen introduced a panoply of cleverly-named legislative proposals to create a green card for foreign students receiving graduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields can work in the United States immediately post-graduation. Yet, some fear that an accelerated inflow of foreign workers may depress wages and crowd out opportunities for Americans. Very soon, the American public will see some version of these proposals in a much-anticipated comprehensive immigration reform bill.

Read Here – Brookings

The Truth About Geoengineering

With predictions about climate change growing direr every week, geoengineering (which includes everything from fertilizing the oceans in an attempt to cajole great blooms of carbon-sucking phytoplankton to spraying particles into the upper atmosphere to make the earth more reflective) is starting to look more attractive. But the science still lags behind the ambitions. To understand how such schemes would work in practice — and what their consequences would be — it is time to start small-scale field tests.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

No Wars for Water

The world economic downturn and upheaval in the Arab world might grab headlines, but another big problem looms: environmental change. Along with extreme weather patterns, rising sea levels, and other natural hazards, global warming disrupts freshwater resource availability — with immense social and political implications. Earlier this year, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published a report, Global Water Security, assessing hydropolitics around the world. In it, the authors show that international water disputes will affect not only the security interests of riparian states, but also of the United States.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Race Is On as Ice Melt Reveals Arctic Treasures

With Arctic ice melting at record pace, the world’s superpowers are increasingly jockeying for political influence and economic position in outposts like this one, previously regarded as barren wastelands. At stake are the Arctic’s abundant supplies of oil, gas and minerals that are, thanks to climate change, becoming newly accessible along with increasingly navigable polar shipping shortcuts. This year, China has become a far more aggressive player in this frigid field, experts say, provoking alarm among Western powers. While the United States, Russia and several nations of the European Union have Arctic territory, China has none, and as a result, has been deploying its wealth and diplomatic clout to secure toeholds in the region.

Read Here – New York Times

10 Things You Don’t Know About Africa’s Booming Economy

Africa is no longer the “lost continent” of popular imagination. The region has been growing rapidly for over a decade, the private sector is expanding, and a new class of consumers is wielding considerable spending power. And because of its young and growing population, the sky is the limit for future growth: Between 2010 and 2020, the continent is set to add 122 million people to its labor force. An expansion of this magnitude should set the stage for dynamic growth, but capturing this potential will require a change in economic development strategy. At its current pace, Africa is not generating wage-paying jobs rapidly enough to absorb its massive labor force, which will be the largest in the world by 2035.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

From Brain Drain to Brain Flow: The New Economy of Innovation Turbulence

At one time in the recent past, leaders in developing countries and in international organizations decried the “brain drain” that led the best and brightest in what we used to call the “third world” to emigrate to the West to take advantage of superior educational and employment opportunities. The United States was the destination of choice, both for these reasons and because other societies were seen as less hospitable to immigrants. Read Here – Foreign Policy Research Institute

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