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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Sikkim”

Hindu Nationalism Risks Pushing India Into War With China

Where the China-India competition goes hinges on each side’s strength and wisdom. India is weaker than China in terms of national strength, but its strategists and politicians have shown no wisdom in preventing India’s China policy from being kidnapped by rising nationalism. This will put India’s own interests in jeopardy. India should be careful and not let religious nationalism push the two countries into war.

Read Here – Global Times

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Trust Must Be Built Between Beijing And Delhi

To better manage disputes and differences, it is now imperative to build trust between Beijing and New Delhi. The foreign policy and strategic circles of the two countries need to maintain dialogues and communications on a regular basis. Equally important, people-to-people exchanges are indispensable to consolidate better understanding of the will of the people of the two countries.

Read Here – The Indian Express

China Flexes Its Military Muscle In Tibet, Close To Border Dispute With India

Chinese troops have taken part in a military exercise using live ammunition in Tibet, as the country remains locked in a stand-off with India in a disputed border area close by, state media reported.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

This Standoff Is China Telling India To Accept Changing Realities

China’s creeping encirclement of India confronts New Delhi with the choice of either accommodating itself to Chinese primacy or of hedging in partnership with the US and Japan against China’s advances, fuelling the regional rivalry even further.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: This is India’s China War, round Two

The 30-Year Itch In India-China Ties

The stand-off at the India-Bhutan-China tri-junction reflects the dissonance in the Sino-Indian relationship, driven by a hardening of the Chinese stand on territorial claims. Some Indian analysts suggest a comprehensive relook at India’s approach to such assertiveness, while others believe such a “reset” is already under way. The last such “reset” of relations was in 1988, when Rajiv Gandhi visited China.

Read Here – Mint

High Noon In The Himalayas: Behind The China-India Standoff At Doka La

Map courtesy: War on the Rocks

If you’re struggling to make sense of the latest standoff between the Chinese and Indian militaries 10,000 feet in the Himalayas, don’t fret: You’re in good company. The showdown at Doka La is the product of a multi-layered, multi-party dispute steeped in centuries-old treaties and ambiguous territorial claims. Only recently have sufficient details emerged to piece together a coherent picture of the crisis and we’re still left with more questions than answers.

Read Here – War on the Rocks

China Should Assess India’s Power Dialectically – People’s Daily

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping. File Photo/PIB

Following the recent Sikkim standoff and the finger-pointing between China and India, the Chinese public and media outlets have once again taken notice of their long-neglected neighbour, with many experts calling for a better understanding of India’s current power. “India’s [power] should be assessed dialectically. It would be wrong to prettify or look down on our neighbour. Instead, we should objectively analyse India’s pros and cons,” Lin Minwang, a professor at the Institute of International Studies of Fudan University, told Xiakedao, a public WeChat account operated by the People’s Daily.

Read Here – People’s Daily

On India-China Himalayan Face-Off, China May Just Have A Case

All the bluster and threats between India and China these days should not conceal the fact that on the Doklam stand-off China has a case. Yet, the opacity in the position of all three players—India, China and Bhutan— confuses the issue. Certainly, the face-off speaks for the need for an urgent need for all parties to address the issue through negotiations, rather than military means.

Read Here – The Indian Express

As the Splintered History Of Lost Kingdoms Unravels, India, China Need To Confront The Future

It is interesting that in invoking historical justifications in the latest standoff between China and India in the Sikkim and Bhutan tri-junction area, neither party is keen to recall that the region once constituted sovereign principalities – of Tibet, Sikkim and Bhutan. Of the three, Bhutan is still independent, Tibet was taken over by China in 1951 and Sikkim became part of India only in 1975 by the exercise of Article 2 of the Indian constitution. The controversies behind these takeovers is another matter, but the moot point is that the histories of these erstwhile states have been splintered beyond recognition as they have been absorbed into other historical streams.

Read Here – The Wire

After Tibet, China Wants To Occupy Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan And Arunachal To Fulfil Mao’s Old Dream

China’s legendary revolutionary leader Mao Zedong, standing in front of Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in the 1950s, talked about Tibet and the Himalayas: “Xizang (Tibet) is China’s right hand’s palm, which is detached from its five fingers — of Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan and Arunachal (formerly NEFA). As all of these five are either occupied by, or under the influence of India, it is China’s responsibility to ‘liberate’ the five to be rejoined with Xizang (Tibet).”

Read Here – Defence News India

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