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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “SIPRI”

Saudi Arabia: The World’s Largest Arms Importer From 2014-2018

Saudi Arabia became the world’s largest arms importer from 2014 to 2018, accounting for 12 percent of the imports, an increase of 192 percent over 2009-2013, according to the latest report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). According to data for 2018, the United States continued to supply the bulk of arms to Saudi Arabia, accounting for 88 percent of all arms sold to the country.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

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The Challenges That Drive Up Military Spending – In Asia-Pacific And Beyond

Whereas Sino-American arms dynamics could well be attributed to traditional concerns related to interstate dynamics over unresolved flashpoints, much of the rest of the Asia-Pacific region confronts a holistic array of security concerns, especially those that are transboundary and transnational in nature – natural calamities, violent extremism and even the mundane, daily occurrences of cross-border smuggling and illegal fishing, to name just a few examples.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Global Arms Industry: First Rise In Arms Sales Since 2010, Says SIPRI

F-16 jet being re-fuelled mid-air. Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Defense

Sales of arms and military services by the world’s largest arms-producing and military services companies—the SIPRI Top 100—totalled $374.8 billion in 2016. The total for the SIPRI Top 100 in 2016 is 1.9 per cent higher compared with 2015 and represents an increase of 38 per cent since 2002 (when SIPRI began reporting corporate arms sales). This is the first year of growth in SIPRI Top 100 arms sales after five consecutive years of decline.

Read Here – SIPRI

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Harmony or Discord? Foreign Policy Implications of China’s Upcoming Party Congress

As the Communist Party of China prepares for a once-in-a-decade change of leadership at the 18th Party Congress in November, the country’s foreign relations are in worse shape than they were 10 years ago, especially in East Asia but also in terms of heightened strategic rivalry with the United States. How the incoming leadership chooses to manage further the expansion of Chinese economic and security interests has huge implications for the rest of the world. If the incoming Party leadership fails to prevent widening political rifts in China’s political system (including the People’s Liberation Army, (PLA), foreign policy could take on an even more assertive tone, complicating international cooperation with China on issues of international security.

Read Here – SIPRI

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