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Archive for the tag “Socialism”

I Wanted Ronald Reagan. India Kept Electing Bernie Sanders.

In some ways Mr. Modi has proved more statist than the Gandhis. Before he took power he criticised Congress welfare programs as insulting to the poor, who “do not want things for free” and really want “to work and earn a living.” As prime minister, Mr. Modi doubled down on the same programs, expanding the landmark 2006 act that guaranteed 100 days of pay to all rural workers, whether they worked or not.

Read Here – The New York Times

Capitalism’s Great Reckoning

As the maladies of modern capitalism have multiplied, fundamental questions about the future of the world’s dominant economic model have become impossible to ignore. But in the absence of viable alternatives, the question is how to reform a system that is increasingly at odds with democracy.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Marx’s Revenge

If, in these conditions, we are still drawn to the story of Marx’s life, it’s for reasons other than his authority. Amid trying and precarious circumstances, he combined philosophical penetration, literary and journalistic gifts, and revolutionary commitment to a singular degree. And yet the enormous dimensions of his undertaking meant that he could achieve hardly a fraction of what he attempted; in all that he did, he bequeathed tasks to later generations.

Read Here – The Nation

Is It The End Of Road For India’s Congress?

Without the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty—virtually synonymous with the party since 1969, when Indira Gandhi led a band of loyalists out of the original Congress that helped India win independence from Britain some two decades earlier—Indian politics will likely become less feudal and more meritocratic. And Asia’s third largest economy may finally junk the last vestiges of the Nehruvian socialism that helped keep it poor, and the foreign-policy doctrine of nonalignment that placed it at odds with its natural allies in the democratic West, writes Sadanand Dhume

Read Here – The National Interest

Rising China? Responsible China?

The Chinese Communist Party’s Third Plenum released its plan for reforms, including moving toward the free market in allocating resources, abolishing prison reeducation, easing the one-child restriction for some families and eliminating local control over the judiciary. Despite such guidance on reforms, though, the plan is also designed to strengthen the party’s control, writes journalist Frank Ching.

Read Here – YaleGlobal

Centralising Power In China

The recent Third Plenum of the 18th Chinese Communist Party’s Central Committee inaugurated a number of significant reforms. Among the most interesting developments is China’s establishment of a new “State Security Committee” (SSC), an important step in further centralizing power into the hands of the party’s top leadership.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Is Soliciting China A Failed Policy?

When he visited Washington in February of last year, then Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping talked about “a new type of relationship between major countries in the 21st century.” Since then, he has been elevated to general secretary of the Communist Party and this formulation has been shortened to “a new type of great-power relationship.” American analysts still wonder what the phrase means.

Read Here – WorldAffairsJournal

Getting Performance Right

The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) remains in power because its governance system has proven flexible enough to either respond to or preempt emergent social, economic and political pressures.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Economic Year Zero In China

It is inevitable, perhaps, that we tend to focus on leaders when we examine grand political and economic transitions. But they are not the only actors in these dramas. Deng Xiaoping and his colleagues triumphed precisely because they unleashed the creativity and the entrepreneurial urges of millions of Chinese. Many of them — shocking though it might be to think — were not even members of the Chinese Communist Party.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Margaret Thatcher’s Lessons for Europe

Margaret Thatcher was much more respected outside Britain than she was in her own country. In the United States, but also in Central Europe, she is recognized as a hero, especially in the fight for economic and political freedom. That vision of freedom and dynamism was never really all that popular – or understood – by the British people. In the end, Thatcher’s achievement was also distorted by her own mistakes in dealing with the complex politics of a Europe that was rapidly changing in the aftermath of the collapse of communism.
Read Here – Project Syndicate

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