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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Society”

From Google To Facebook And beyond: New Generation Of Elites, Superpowered By AI

Elites have always used their privileged position and access to resources for self-serving purposes, not for the greater good of humanity. And this abuse continues, disguised, as elites harness artificial intelligence and other new technologies to reach new levels of power previously undreamed of. A new breed of elites is born: “ailites”.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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Authoritarians Fool the World, But For How Long?

The foreign policy implications of an authoritarian world in which each nation strives for narrow advantages and fails to coordinate actions on trade, migration, climate change and other cross-border concerns are not promising. With young people becoming more politically active, their “green” positions may check politicians who try to argue that the “burden” of adjustment should not fall on their nation.

Read Here – Yale Global

Are Indian Democracy’s Weaknesses Inherent?

The standard contrast between Chinese authoritarian efficiency and Indian democratic dysfunction is, however, too simplistic. Authoritarianism is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for some of the special features of Chinese governance. Similarly, not all of the Indian state’s shortcomings are inherent in the country’s democratic system. Failure to appreciate such nuances risks overlooking three especially important governance issues.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

China’s Army Of Migrant Workers Is Becoming Older And Less Mobile

Annual survey by Beijing shows China’s migrant workers are less inclined to travel long distances for work, with governments offering grants to stay locally. The average age of migrant workers is rising, with a new generation of workers less content to work in factories or construction sites.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Populism’s Common Denominator

What unites supporters of authoritarian, upstart politicians like US President Donald Trump and Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro is revulsion against the corruption of the political process. But voters will learn the hard way that strongman rule exacerbates rather than mitigates corruption.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Slow, Dangerous Implosion Of Saudi Crown Prince Muhammad Bin Salman

Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman (MBS) now stands alone at the top of the hierarchy, but he has lost many constituencies that allow him to rule without resorting to direct force. This situation is unsustainable and even dangerous. There’s been a serious erosion of regime legitimacy, and this is leading to a slow implosion from within.

Read Here – Newsweek

Why Pakistan Is Caught In A Vicious Cycle Of Extremism

The state is hesitant to control religious hatred. Deep-rooted hate narratives have developed a majoritarian mindset, which creates insecurity among the very tiny religious minorities. Even ‘naya Pakistan’ has not yet shown the courage to break the vicious cycle of this hatred.

Read Here – Dawn

In Illinois, Obama Hits The Midterm Campaign Trail—And Trump

One hazard of the trolling that the United States has been subjected to from the White House for the past twenty months is that even the most alarming patterns can be hard to discern, and the most prominent dots impossible to connect.

Read Here – The New Yorker

“Rivers of Blood:” The Legacy Of A Speech That Divided Britain

On April 20, 1968, Enoch Powell, a leading member of the Conservative Party in the British parliament, made a speech that would imprint itself into British memory—and divide the nation with its racist, incendiary rhetoric. Speaking before a group of conservative activists, Powell said that if immigration to Britain from the country’s former colonies continued, a violent clash between white and black communities was inevitable.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Nobody Knows Anything About China

As a foreigner in China, you get used to hearing the retort “You don’t know China!” spat at you by locals. It’s usually a knee-jerk reaction to some uncomfortable modern issue or in defense of one of the many historical myths children in the mainland are taught as unshakeable facts about the world. But it’s also true. We don’t know China. Nor, however, do the Chinese — not even the government.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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