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Archive for the tag “soft power”

How Some Countries Are Using Covid To Enhance Soft Power

The Covid-19 pandemic has given rise to various new, repurposed or newly popular terms. The newest entry to the pandemic lexicon might be “vaccine diplomacy,” with some countries using their vaccines to strengthen regional ties and enhance their own power and global status.

Read Here | Asia Times

The Problem With Soft Power

Considering soft power’s relatively low-risk and low-cost nature, in combination with the castrated successes of military campaigns since 2000, we’re left asking the obvious question: Why hasn’t the United States shifted to a foreign policy approach that incorporates more soft power approaches in lieu of continued bloated hard power initiatives?

Read Here | Foreign Policy Research Institute

China Can Buy Influence, But It Can’t Buy Love

If it’s going to compete with the United States for superpower status, it will have to match America’s soft power… But China has a distinct disadvantage: It’s not as attractive as America. Few people around the world voluntarily listen to Chinese songs, watch Chinese television, use Chinese slang (or any Chinese words), or dress like the Chinese people they see on TV.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Manifestos Of BJP, Congress Indicate That When It Comes To Foreign Policy, Ambiguity Is Better Than Clarity

Looking at the foreign policy sections of the election manifestos, you might be forgiven for thinking that the Indian political class is barely interested in the world beyond its shores. On the face of it, this seems odd. After all, India’s relative weight has rapidly risen in the last two decades.

Read Here – The Indian Express

The Limits Of China’s Charm Offensive

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

Facing escalating geopolitical competition with the US, China is scrambling to win friends in East Asia. But while China’s neighbours will undoubtedly welcome any respite from Chinese belligerence, they will not be fooled by sweet talk – or even sweet trade deals.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Chinese Culture Ministry Merger In The Works In Renewed Overseas Soft Power Push

China will merge two ministerial-level agencies into one overarching cultural body to try to boost its soft power and reverse setbacks in its international image abroad. The country’s media regulator – the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television – was set to merge with the Ministry of Culture to create a super cultural ministry to expand the scope of China’s ideological influence.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Rising Role Of Buddhism In India’s Soft Power Strategy

The Modi-led government is placing a strong accent on the use of soft power in India’s foreign policy. One of the more novel manifestations of these initiatives has been engagement in Buddhist diplomacy. The Buddhist faith, due to its emphasis on peaceful co-existence and its wide pan-Asian presence, lends itself well to soft-power diplomacy.

Read Here – Observer Research Foundation

How Sharp Power Threatens Soft Power

Sharp power,” as coined by Christopher Walker and Jessica Ludwig of the National Endowment for Democracy, refers to the information warfare being waged by today’s authoritarian powers, particularly China and Russia. Over the past decade, Beijing and Moscow have spent tens of billions of dollars to shape public perceptions and behaviour around the world—using tools new and old that exploit the asymmetry of openness between their own restrictive systems and democratic societies.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

How China Infiltrated U.S. Classrooms

More than a decade after they were created, Confucius Institutes have sprouted up at more than 500 college campuses worldwide, with more than 100 of them in the United States—including at The George Washington University, the University of Michigan and the University of Iowa. Overseen by a branch of the Chinese Ministry of Education known colloquially as Hanban, the institutes are part of a broader propaganda initiative that the Chinese government is pumping an estimated $10 billion into annually, and they have only been bolstered by growing interest in China among American college students.

Read Here – Politico

Why Australia’s Cure For Chinese Influence Is Worse Than The Disease

Over the past year, Chinese Australians who form the largest overseas Chinese community in Oceania, have found themselves at the centre of unwanted attention and scrutiny from the Australian government, intelligence services and media. In what appeared a concerted campaign, some of the community’s prominent business leaders were accused of acting as possible agents of the Chinese government by seeking, at its behest, to influence Australia’s domestic politics through political donations.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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