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Archive for the tag “South Korea”

A Little Bit Of History: Why Are There Two Koreas

The Koreas were split at the end of WWII. That was when the Japanese, who annexed the peninsula in 1910, were replaced by occupying forces from the Soviet Union in the north and the United States in the south. The partition line at the 38th parallel would eventually mark the border of what have become vastly different countries.

Read Here – Jstor Daily

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The UAE’s Nuclear Push

But Iran isn’t the only reason why we might be at the beginning stages of an Arab arms race. The Saudis don’t want to be “one-upped” by the Emiratis, so they too have embarked on a very ambitious nuclear plan (especially with oil prices at around $50 a barrel), involving 16 nuclear reactors to be built by 2032.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Unfinished Legacy of Obama’s Pivot To Asia

The gridlocked TPP trade deal. Reclaimed islands in the South China Sea. North Korean nukes. How will history judge President Obama’s rebalance to Asia?

Read Here – Foreign Policy

The Five Most Powerful Navies of 2030

Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya - Courtesy Indian Navy

Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya – Courtesy Indian Navy

The most powerful navies in 2030 will be a reflection of the broader state of the world. Some countries are invested in preserving the current international order, and see naval power as a means to maintain it. Other emerging countries are building navies commensurate with their newfound sense of status, often with an eye towards challenging that order.

Read Here – The National Interest

Strengthening The Asian Pivot

The U.S. is deploying nine aircraft and hundreds of U.S. troops and special operators to at least seven bases in the Philippines as part of a new, regular presence there, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced.

Read Here – Stars and Stripes

Asia-Pacific Military Power Balance Shifting Against The United States?

Courtesy: US Department of Defense

Courtesy: US Department of Defense

Geopolitically, most states in the Asia-Pacific region are embracing closer security and economic ties with the United States. At the same time, however, states across the region have become more sensitive to China’s growing political, economic, and military power, and are potentially vulnerable to Beijing’s increasingly coercive behavior. The U.S. relationship with China is complex, mixing elements of cooperation and competition.

Read Here – Center for Strategic and International Studies

UN Security Council Plans Emergency Meeting On North Korea

The U.N. Security Council plans to convene an emergency meeting Wednesday morning to discuss what North Korea says is its first successful hydrogen bomb test.

Read Here – Nikkei Asian Review

 

Saudi Arabia Spends Billions To Get Asia Hooked On Its Crude Oil

At the heart of South Korea’s Onsan Refinery lies a street called “A.I. Naimi Road,” an homage to Saudi Arabia’s oil minister. The reason: state-owned Saudi Arabian Oil Co. holds a 65 percent stake in the complex.

Read Here – Bloomberg

China And Obama’s TPP

Is the TPP really targeting China? US President Barack Obama said on Monday, “we can’t let countries like China write the rules of the global economy. We should write those rules, opening new markets to American products while setting high standards for protecting workers and preserving our environment.”
This is not the first time that Obama expressed such views. This seems to prove that the US-led TPP is aimed at China. Objectively speaking, some TPP partners want to use the agreement as leverage against China. But it’s not surprising that geopolitical considerations mingle with economic relations.

Read Here – The Global Times

If Not Xi, Who?

If political infighting in the Communist Party were to result in political instability in China, its foreign policy would become less predictable and more governed by appeals to an aggressive nationalism that is already on the rise within the population at large.  That would be a bad outcome for the United States and for China’s Asian neighbors.

Read Here – Politico

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