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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “submarines”

Japan’s Arms Merchants Are Off To A Rocky Start

When Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government redrew Japan’s self-imposed arms export restrictions in 2014, it hoped to spark a revolution in a domestic defense industry that had been isolated for almost 40 years. In part, it succeeded. In June, Japanese companies such as Fuji and Kawasaki Heavy Industries displayed military helicopters and warplanes at the Maritime Air Systems and Technologies Asia exhibition in Tokyo – still a rare event for the pacifist nation…

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

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Asian Sub Spending Spree Raises Risks Of Mistakes, Escalation

For more than a decade, Asian countries have been on a submarine spending spree. Some countries are updating obsolete vessels while others are purchasing submarines for the first time. This trend has largely been driven by growing concerns nations have over maintaining a deterrent against an increasingly assertive China broadly, but also rivalries with neighbours and a desire to maintain technological parity with rivals.

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

Also read:  Why Subs? To Send Neighbors a Powerful Message – “Stay Outta My Yard”

China Defends Submarine Sales To Pakistan

In terms of military strength, the Indian Navy has two aircraft carriers in service and is building a new indigenous one. It has 15 submarines, almost twice that of Pakistan.  More importantly, India’s domestically developed nuclear-powered submarine, INS Arihant, has undergone several sea trials and will soon enter service. New Delhi is also planning at least six more nuclear-powered submarines. In comparison, it will take eight to 10 years for Pakistan to incorporate the eight submarines from China into its combat capacity. It will be extremely hard to break the military balance of India and Pakistan with the latest acquisition. Pakistan is actually trying to prevent the gap between its naval strength and India’s from widening, argues Qian Feng.

Read Here – Global Times

The Trillion-Dollar Question: Who Will Control The South China Sea?

Recent developments in the South China Sea have lumbered U.S. strategic planners with a number of pressing quandaries. Should the United States send warships through sea lanes claimed by China as territorial waters?  How can Washington signal resolve and reassurance to its allies in the region without unduly antagonizing China’s political and military leaders?  What is the right mix of diplomacy, military, and political engagement?

Read Here – The National Interest

India Is A Key Partner In Indo-Pacific Region, Says Australia

As two prominent Indian Ocean states, India and Australia are cooperating closely in the region. Building cooperation helps to provide for a more secure maritime environment. By 2030, the Indo-Pacific region is expected to account for 21 of the top 25 sea and air trade routes; around two-thirds of global oil shipments; and one third of the world’s bulk cargo movements. So improving security will be crucial to protecting our prosperity. In this setting, it is not surprising that, being Indian Ocean states, defence engagement between Australia and India focuses on joint naval cooperation., writes Australian Defence Minister Kevin Andrews.

Read Here – The Hindu

India-Australia Drills Targeting Submarines Rattle China

India and Australia will focus on anti-submarine warfare in their first ever joint naval exercises, signaling a growing strategic relationship to counter China’s increased activity in the Indian Ocean.

Read Here – Bloomberg

From Remote Outpost, India Looks To Check China’s Indian Ocean Thrust

Scattered between the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea, the Andaman and Nicobar islands are closer to Myanmar and Indonesia than the Indian mainland. More importantly, its southern isles lie near the top of the Malacca Straits, a gateway to the Indian Ocean and through which China gets three-quarters of its oil.

Read Here – Reuters

How China Could Become A Two-Ocean Power (Thanks to Pakistan)

China’s interest in deepening its involvement in Pakistan is nothing new. What has changed and has enabled the Chinese to intensify their focus on Pakistan, is the effective end of the West’s, and in particular the United States’, military operations in Afghanistan in 2015. Accordingly, NATO’s departure from Afghanistan has had two consequences: it has created a regional power vacuum and it has diminished America’s interest in Pakistan. And China has quickly jumped into the breach.

Read Here – The National Interest

Pakistan A Sincere And Reliable Friend, Says Xi

“This will be my first trip to Pakistan, but I feel as if I am going to visit the home of my own brother. Over the years, thanks to the nurturing of generations of leaders and people from all sectors of both countries, China-Pakistan friendship has flourished like a tree growing tall and strong,” Chinese President Xi Jinping writes in the Daily Times ahead of his state visit to Pakistan.

Read Here – Daily Times

Pakistan’s $45 Bln Santa Claus And India’s Worries

Chinese President Xi Jinping is heading to Islamabad on a two-day visit starting Monday, which, deepened by billions of dollars of likely investments, is expected to test Beijing’s capacity to avoid antagonising India too much.

Read Here – The Hindu

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