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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Tawang”

India Moves Mountains To Build Military Road To China Border

India is accelerating work on strategic roads to be able to move troops and supplies to the border faster and deploy sophisticated weapons if armed conflict breaks out. China already has extensive infrastructure on its side.

Read Here – Wall Street Journal

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Why China, India And The Dalai Lama Are Pushing The Boundaries In Tawang

Relations between China and India have become strained of late. India complains China is preventing it from bringing to book Pakistan-sheltered terrorists, blocking its entry into an elite group of nuclear suppliers and pushing ahead with infrastructure projects in Pakistan that threaten its security interests.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China Will See The Dalai Lama’s Visit To Tawang As A Provocation

New Delhi still has two weeks to find a compromise formula on the Dalai Lama’s visit to Tawang that will allow both countries to put the issue back in the freezer. But what will happen if it does not try, or worse still, tries and fails? Will China take military action? And if it does, what will it be?

Read Here – The Wire

The British Forgery At The Heart Of India And China’s Tibetan Border Dispute

The McMahon Line, drawn at the behest of the British Raj in 1914, has been adopted by the Indian government as the definitive statement of its border with China in the northeast, although the line has never been accepted by any Chinese government. It was drawn by Henry McMahon and accepted by representatives of the Tibetan government in bilateral discussions that were contemporaneous but separate from the abortive tripartite British/Tibetan/Chinese negotiations on the Simla Convention.

Read More – South China Morning Post

Why China May Be Plotting A ‘Short’ Border War With India As In 1962

n essence, China is developing a two-front war capability vis-à-vis India and hobble it with various insurgencies – a Pakistan-propped one in the west, and a more covert one in the north-east. The aim may be to get us to part with Tawang, with or without a short war. With Tawang won, China will put up a show of “magnanimity” and offer to settle the border elsewhere.

Read Here – Firstpost

Tibet’s Reality

From nearly any point in Lhasa, capital of China’s Tibet Autonomous Region, you can see at least two police checkpoints.

Read Here – The Atlantic

How China Fights: Lessons From the 1962 Sino-Indian War

The rest of the world may have forgotten the anniversary, but a neglected border war that took place 50 years ago is now more pertinent than ever. Before dawn on the morning of Oct. 20, 1962, the People’s Liberation Army launched a surprise attack, driving with overwhelming force through the eastern and western sections of the Himalayas, deep into northeastern India. On the 32nd day of fighting, Beijing announced a unilateral ceasefire, and the war ended as abruptly as it had begun. Ten days later, the Chinese began withdrawing from the areas they had penetrated on India’s eastern flank, between Bhutan and Burma, but they kept their territorial gains in the West—part of the original princely state of Jammu and Kashmir. India had suffered a humiliating rout, and China’s international stature had grown substantially.

Read Here – Newsweek

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