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foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Tony Blair”

The World The Iraq War Made

The damage from regime change in Iraq has been substantial. According to the Chilcot report, at least 150,000 Iraqis (and possibly four times that number) have been killed in the years since the invasion, and an estimated three million people have been displaced from their homes. The security situation is far worse than under Saddam, and the economy is no better.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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The Invasion Of Iraq Was Never Really About Oil

Misconceptions and outright misrepresentations of the role of oil in the Iraqi debacle remain, spawning conspiracy theories about conflicts from Libya, Syria and Gaza to Afghanistan. The corrupt and sclerotic energy sector continues to hold back the economy and blight the lives of ordinary Iraqis. Searching the Chilcot report to justify decade-old slogans of “no blood for oil” does not help them.

Read Here – The National

Britain’s Iraq War Reckoning

The long-awaited Chilcot report found Britain joined the U.S.-led war against Saddam Hussein before “peaceful options for disarmament” had been exhausted.

Read Here – The Atlantic

What Donald Rumsfeld Knew We Didn’t Know About Iraq

A new document reveals gap of intelligence on WMD. Why didn’t the chief of Pentagon share it with others?

Read Here – Politco

Is It Really Better That Saddam’s Gone?

Saddam was a tyrant and an aggressor, but are Iraq and the region really better off without him? Consider just some of the consequences of the war that removed him.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Ultimate ‘What If’: A World Where America Never Invaded Iraq

Every player of the popular video game Civilization knows to hit the save button before engaging in the risky, stupid invasion of foreign country. In the case of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, it became apparent after the first few months that the war was not working out as its framers had envisioned. The failure to find weapons of mass destruction was only the icing, so to speak, on the disaster of failed reconciliation, state collapse, and executive incompetence.

Read Here – The National Interest

Terror Threats And People’s Rights

By the time Tony Blair left office in 2007, he had built a surveillance state unrivalled anywhere in the democratic world. Parliament passed 45 criminal justice laws – more than the total for the previous century – creating more than 3,000 new criminal offences. That corresponded to two new offences for each day parliament sat during his premiership.

Seeking Allah in the Midlands

Islam appears to hold a strange fascination for white British women who are converting to it in large numbers. Of an estimated 50,000 or so white Britons who convert to Islam every year, some two-thirds are thought to be women. Most of them are independent career women — bankers, doctors, broadcasters — who know what they are doing, and often do so in the face of opposition from family and friends. High profile converts include Lauren Booth, sister-in-law of former Prime Minister Tony Blair, well-known journalist Yvonne Ridley and MTV presenter Kristiane Backer.

Read Here – The Hindu

Judging George W. Bush

George W. Bush’s low standing among academics reflects, in part, the rise of partisan scholarship: the use of history as ideology and as a political weapon, which means the corruption of history as history. Bush may not have been a great president; he may even be considered an average or below-average president, but he and — more important — the nation deserve better than this partisan rush to judgment.

Read Here – Washington Post

Why There Were No Good Guys In 2003

Much is already known about the lies, deceptions, and institutional failures which made the invasion of Iraq possible, and detail has emerged about the effect on the Iraqi population of the invaders’ chemical weapons and depleted-uranium ammunition. Yet the central assemblies of the two countries which led the invasion bear the heaviest responsibility. They failed to question their political executives, failed to use the powers they rightly hold, and failed to remember what they owe to the voters who legitimate their very presence in an elected assembly. They betrayed representative democracy itself.

Read Here – The Hindu

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