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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “trade”

Trump’s disruptive Foreign Policy Will Be Tested In Four Major ways This Month

February brings the most significant series of tests yet of whether President Trump can transform his disruptive U.S. foreign policy into concrete outcomes. The four to watch most closely are: negotiating a trade deal with China, denuclearising North Korea, rallying an international community to contain Iran, and democratising Venezuela.

Read Here – CNBC

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China’s Economic Reforms Are Working. The Bad News Is The Pain May Get Worse

The Chinese economy ended 2018 on a weak note, but not so weak that people now fear growth will fall off a cliff. Gross domestic product growth in the fourth quarter clocked in at 6.4 per cent, the weakest since the first quarter of 2009, but in line with market expectations. The quarterly growth profile, which shows a persistent weakening trend – from 6.8 per cent in the first quarter, to 6.7 per cent6.5 per cent and now 6.4 per cent – is indicative of the harsher conditions facing the economy.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

U.S.-India Relations: The Trump Administration’s Foreign Policy Bright Spot

It’s customary these days to lament U.S. relations with allied countries like Germany and Canada, or to worry about warmth with unfriendly ones like Russia and North Korea. Ties with India, however, are a refreshingly positive outlier. Bilateral relations are mostly healthy and both sides continue to raise their strategic bet on a close long-term partnership. With the United States and India sustaining deepening ties across multiple administrations, their leaders should grow more ambitious still.

Read Here – War On The Rocks

The Rise Of Populism Shows We Are Increasingly In A ‘Geopolitical Recession’

Financial markets must start to account for the personalities of populist world leaders, according to veteran investment banker and philanthropist John Studzinski. His comments come at a time when market participants are increasingly concerned about a serious economic slowdown, with a long-running global trade war souring business and consumer sentiment.

Read Here – CNBC

China Economy Slows Further, Matching Its Lowest Ever Quarterly Growth

The Chinese economy slowed further in the fourth quarter, matching its lowest recorded reading, last reached during the global financial crisis in 2009. The fourth quarter growth rate of 6.4 per cent, year on year, matched that of the first quarter of 2009, according to data released Monday by the National Bureau of Statistics. That was the lowest growth rate since the Chinese government began publishing quarterly growth rates at the beginning of 1992. 

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: Trade war or peace, China is seeking economic stability not growth

The Brexit Deal’s Historic Defeat

The likelihood of Britain leaving the European Union without a deal just got a whole lot higher—and Prime Minister Theresa May is largely to blame. On Tuesday, British lawmakers overwhelmingly voted against May’s negotiated agreement with the EU, delivering a damaging (albeit foreseeable) blow to her Brexit strategy.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Euro Turns 20

The euro’s first 20 years played out very differently than many expected, highlighting the importance of recognizing that the future is likely to be different from the past. Given this, only a commitment to flexibility and a willingness to rise to new challenges will ensure the common currency’s continued success.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

When The China Dream And The European Dream Collide

Europe’s non-geopolitical view appears to be changing as many European countries individually and the European Union collectively start to see China as a potential competitor. In addition, China’s Made in 2025 strategy served as an important wake up call to high-tech European industry.

Read Here – War On The Rocks

Asia Stumbles Into Year Of The Currency War

True, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin effectively declared an end to the 24-year-old strong dollar policy in January 2018. The White House quickly backtracked as markets quaked. In 2019, expect a new currency push. One motivation: US growth is losing momentum. Trump is anxious to keep the key source of his legitimacy humming along. The bigger objective, though, is reminding Asia who’s boss.

Read Here – Asia Times

Will Xi Jinping Tighten His Grip On Power In 2019?

Coming to the end of 2018, the atmosphere in the People’s Republic has become increasingly dominated by Xi’s presence and image. During the Forum for China African Cooperation in September, an already infamous cover of the official People’s Daily had Xi’s name in headlines almost 20 times on the front page.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

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