Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Ukraine”

Why A Comedian Won Ukraine’s Presidency In A Landslide

Ukraine’s new president-elect, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, is in many ways the ideal poster boy for the antiestablishment trend currently sweeping world politics. A media-savvy TV celebrity who has never previously held political office, he has made a virtue of his inexperience by posing as an everyman candidate untainted by the rot within the system.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Advertisements

The Untold Story Of Notpetya, The Most Devastating Cyberattack In History

Photo by Irvan Smith on Unsplash

All across Maersk headquarters, the full scale of the crisis was starting to become clear. Within half an hour, Maersk employees were running down hallways, yelling to their colleagues to turn off computers or disconnect them from Maersk’s network before the malicious software could infect them, as it dawned on them that every minute could mean dozens or hundreds more corrupted PCs.

Read Here – Wired

What Should The World Expect From The Trump-Putin Summit?

Given the tense state of U.S.-Russian relations and the paucity of high-level contacts, there are strong arguments for Trump to hold a summit with Putin. However fractured the relationship, it makes sense for the world’s two nuclear superpowers to sit down together and re-establish some of the channels of communication that were cut off after Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and war in southeastern Ukraine.

Read Here – The National Interest

From Bitcoin to Belize, Here Are Best And Worst Assets Of 2017

It was a great year for copper, Ukrainian stocks, palladium. Uzbekistan’s currency, Venezuelan bonds and sugar not so much. It was a great year to hold bitcoin, but a bad time to have been invested in the Uzbek soum.

How A Luxury Hong Kong Home Was Used As Cover In Deal For China’s First Aircraft Carrier

The high-profile purchase of an opulent home on The Peak in 1998 by a Hong Kong-based businessman was cover for the purchase of what would become China’s first aircraft carrier. Xu Zengping, 65, the People’s Liberation Army Navy proxy who bought the unfinished carrier from a Ukrainian shipyard, said the purchase of the HK$220 million (US$28.1 million) luxury home in 1998 was aimed at convincing the outside world that he had the financial capability to turn the 300-metre Varyag into a floating casino. It instead became China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, which was commissioned in 2012.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Chernobyl: City Of Ghosts

In a post-Cold War world, the fear of nuclear holocaust has receded from the global consciousness. Donald Trump’s threat of unleashing “fire and fury like the world has never seen” against North Korea was an untimely and unwelcome reminder of a past, perilous era. Even by Trump’s standards these statements were a new low. And they are dangerous. History teaches us that the journey from political logorrhea to global disaster can be terrifyingly short.

Read Here – Politico Europe

The Biggest Cybersecurity Disasters Of 2017 So Far

The first six months of 2017 have seen an inordinate number of cybersecurity meltdowns. And they weren’t just your standard corporate breaches. It’s only July, and already there’s been viral, state-sponsored ransomware, leaks of spy tools from US intelligence agencies, and full-on campaign hacking. And that’s just the beginning.

Read Here – Wired

Ukrainians Say Petya Ransomware Hides State-Sponsored Attacks

When a ransomware outbreak exploded from Ukraine across Europe yesterday, disrupting companies, government agencies, and critical infrastructure, it at first appeared to be just another profit-focused cybercriminal scheme—albeit a particularly vicious and damaging one. But its origins in Ukraine raised deeper questions. After all, shadowy hackers have waged a cyberwar there for years, likely at Russia’s bidding.

Read Here – Wired

Also Read: Writing The Rules Of Cyberwar

The ABCs Of Russian Military Power: A Primer For The New (U.S.) Administration

The Russian military that the United States faces in 2017 is not the poorly equipped and uncoordinated force that invaded Georgia in August of 2008…Following reforms launched in October 2008, and a modernization program in 2011 valued at $670 billion, the armed forces have become one of Russia’s most reliable instruments of national power.

Read Here The National Interest

China To Expand Military Reach with A Fleet Of The World’s Largest Planes

The Soviets built a single Antonov An-225 cargo jet — the longest and heaviest airplane ever built — to carry the Buran space shuttle. Now China wants a fleet of them.

Read Here – Defense One

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: