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Archive for the tag “United States”

Zuckerberg Offers the Bare Minimum On The Cambridge Analytica Mess

Two years and four months after Facebook found out that Cambridge Analytica might have illicitly pulled user data from its platform, and five days after the latest round of stories about the political consultancy’s electioneering, Mark Zuckerberg finally made a statement about the situation.

Read Here – The Atlantic


Reflections On A War Gone Wrong

4,500 U.S. troops died in Iraq, and countless more returned home with physical and psychological wounds they—and we, as a society—will deal with for the rest of their lives. As a nation, we have sunk over one trillion dollars into Iraq so far— one trillion dollars you see missing every day in unpaved roads, underpaid teachers, and the social services our congressional leadership tells us we don’t have the resources to fund, writes Andrew Exum.

Read Here – Defense One

Also read: The Iraq War and the Inevitability of Ignorance

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang Rejects Claims Beijing Is Trying To Buy Global Influence

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang rejected suggestions that China was leveraging its economic strength to gain political influence on the world stage…The United States, Germany, India and Australia have all raised concerns about China’s growing influence, which has expanded significantly through its trade and infrastructure development plan known as the “Belt and Road Initiative”.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Pros and Cons Of Trump’s Random Foreign Policy

The key feature of a non-principled, fast-alternating foreign policy is that no one knows exactly what you are going to do next. That makes it hard for your enemies to plot against you. Russian President Vladimir Putin has used a version of this strategy to great effect. Almost no one anticipated the invasion of Ukraine. Even fewer thought that Putin would seek to make Russia into a Middle Eastern player again by intervening extensively in the Syrian civil war.

Read Here – Bloomberg View

How Long Will the World’s Most Powerful Leaders Last?

The international pecking order is usually defined by economic and military might. That puts the U.S. at the top of the pile, with China gaining fast in second place. But when it comes to tackling long-term global challenges such as climate change, poverty or peacemaking, it’s also vital to identify which leaders are likely to stick around.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Don’t Push Us, China Says To Trump’s Demand For US$100 Billion Cut In The Sino-US Trade Gap

Beijing underscored its determination to protect its interests after Washington demanded a US$100 billion cut in China’s trade surplus with the United States.  Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said that the two countries should resolve their disputes through talks, since a trade war would not benefit either country. China would protect its legitimate rights if “something happens we don’t want to see”, he said.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Man Behind The North Korea Negotiations

Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump are the volatile, captivating stars of North Korea’s nuclear drama—including the shocking twist last week in which Trump said he would accept Kim’s reported offer of a summit meeting. Given the outsized personalities at center stage, it’s easy to forget who is actually directing the plot: South Korean President Moon Jae In, who over the past eight months has been quietly pushing events to this point.

Read Here – The Atlantic  

Decades of U.S. Diplomacy With North Korea: A Timeline

President Donald Trump stunned the world, and even parts of his own administration, when he agreed last week to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for talks amid a high-wire nuclear standoff. There were major talks and nuclear milestones that came before Trump.

Read Here – Foreign Policy


China To Restructure Foreign Affairs Team In Push For Greater Role On World Stage

China is set to introduce significant changes to its foreign affairs structure with the merger of two ministerial-level organisations under its top diplomat, as it continues to push for greater recognition as a global leader, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Under the plan, the Communist Party department responsible for relations with overseas political parties would be consolidated with the party’s foreign policy coordination office.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

A New Order For The Indo-Pacific

China has transformed the Indo-Pacific region’s strategic landscape in just five years. If other powers do not step in to counter further challenges to the territorial and maritime status quo, the next five years could entrench China’s strategic advantages.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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