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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “urbanisation”

How India’s Battle With Climate Change Could Determine All Of Our Fates

Of all the most polluting nations – US, China, Russia, Japan and the EU bloc – only India’s carbon emissions are rising: they rose almost 5% in 2016. No one questions India’s right to develop, or the fact that its current emissions per person are tiny. But when building the new India for its 1.3 billion people, whether it relies on coal and oil or clean, green energy will be a major factor in whether global warming can be tamed.

Read Here – The Guardian

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The Human Dimensions Of Climate Change In Asia And The Pacific

Why Do Some Cities Create More Jobs Than Others?

img_510219 million more jobs! Yes, that’s the number of additional jobs that would have been created had ‘average’ cities performed as well as their competitive counterparts. 75% of these jobs would have been in the private sector. What is a competitive city? How does a city become one? Is your city competitive?

Read Here – The World Bank Group

Chasing China In Africa Difficult For The US

Africa’s resource wealth is certainly of huge importance to China, a manufacturing superpower that is urbanizing and building infrastructure on an unprecedented scale. Unlike Western powers, however, China sees raw materials as only one of the three pillars of its Africa strategy. The second pillar involves using Africa as a springboard to help Chinese businesses emerge as global players.

 

Read Here – Businessweek

Lonely in China

In China, three demographics increasingly stand out: Unmarried young workers, couples who have delayed or foregone childbirth, and elderly empty-nesters. 160 million Chinese households, or 40 percent of the nationwide total, now consist only of one or two people.

Read Here – TeaLeafNation

In China, Prostitution And Corruption Go Hand In Hand

If the Xi Jinping administration truly wants to address corruption, then China’s prostitution problem needs to be addressed as a part of the anti-graft campaign. In order to address this issue, local law enforcement urgently needs to be reformed. Authorities should not be incentivized to collect fees or fines from prostitutes to cover operational costs. In order to root out violence against the prostitutes, police must be trained in how to handle suspects properly.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Why Isn’t India A Regional Leader?

Despite overtaking Japan as the third-largest economy, India has lost its leadership role in the continent because, unlike its eastern neighbours, it has ignored is poor

Read Here – The Hindu

Can Asia Urbanize Without Starving?

Is it a Malthusianism catastrophe, or the stuff of farmers’ dreams? With forecasts of Asian food demand doubling by 2050, will the Asia-Pacific’s expanding middle class make agriculture the new oil? Among those answering in the affirmative are commodities traders like Jim Rogers, who has warned of food riots and told investors to buy storable produce.

Read Here – The Diplomat

India: A Demographic Disaster in Making

As ChinaJapan and many other nations face an aging demographic profile, the youth segment of India’s population is growing rapidly, and is projected to continue to do so for the next 30 years. Provided India can act quickly on health, education and employment, this demographic dividend has the potential to inject new dynamism into its flagging economy. Failure to do so, however, will result in demographic disaster.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Global Water Crisis: Too Little, Too Much, Or Lack Of A Plan?

From space, the idea of a global water crisis may seem perplexing: 75 percent of the planet’s surface is blue. But usable fresh water is a tiny fraction of what we see – only 2.5 percent of the water on Earth. And two-thirds of that fresh water is locked away in glaciers, icecaps, and permanent snow. Of the stock of accessible fresh water, 99 percent is in underground aquifers – some are nonrenewable; and in some that are replenishable, ground water is slurped up faster by a growing population than it can be replaced.

But even so, say experts, the problem is perhaps more an issue of recognizing water’s true value, using it efficiently and planning for the lean times, than it is a lack of overall supply.

Read Here – Christian Science Monitor

 

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