looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Washington”

Where Is Barack Obama?

At a moment when many of his former voters believe that America is facing a genuine democratic crisis, former President Barack Obama has been largely silent about what is happening in American politics. Other than a handful of appearances—an interview with David Letterman in a new Netflix show, or an oral history project at MIT—he insists on following protocol and tradition for former presidents, resisting the temptation to jump back into the political fray.

Read Here – The Atlantic


Silicon Valley’s Dangerous Political Game

Google, Facebook, Amazon, and the rest of Silicon Valley are on top of the world. They’ve never enjoyed more success or influence. Yet at the peak of their power, they are stepping on the political accelerator in a way that could backfire spectacularly.

Read Here – Entropy Economics

Forty-Nine Straight Hours Inside Trump’s Washington Hotel

Tourists, $100 vodka cocktails with caviar, a small dog in the arms of the Treasury secretary. It’s a hotel lobby as a symbol of this presidency.

Read Here – Bloomberg

The Foreign-Policy Establishment Defends Itself From Trump

Faced with a U.S. president who is uncommonly critical of conventional expertise and many components of the U.S.-led international order, who communicates in tweets and consumes information via one-pagers and maps, Brookings has reacted in Blob-ian fashion: with a 63-page defense of traditional U.S. foreign policy that contains exactly 37 footnotes and exactly zero maps.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Eclipse Of the West

From Moscow to Beijing, there is no shortage of those ready to declare the “end of the American century”. Yet what is striking is how much traction this notion has gained in the West. In European capitals, the long-held habit of griping about America’s leadership in international affairs has been replaced by a growing concern about a world in which Washington’s commitment to internationalism is diminished.

Read Here – New Statesman

Kissinger’s Washington Is Coming Back Around

Let’s take a moment to savor what looks to be Henry Kissinger’s final act. The man is 93 years old. At that age, most people are lucky to have enough energy for “Wheel of Fortune” and a few Facebook posts. Not Kissinger. These days, he’s playing the influence game against insiders who hadn’t even been born when he was Richard Nixon’s secretary of state.

Read Here – BloombergView

In Kissinger’s Footsteps, Susan Rice Steers Smooth U.S.-China Relations

Susan Rice is the latest national security adviser to inherit the framework of Sino-American relations that was created in 1972 by Henry Kissinger: The Chinese ever since have wanted to deal directly and discreetly with the White House as they pursue a relationship that’s somewhere between cooperation and confrontation.

Read Here – Wall Street Journal

What To Expect From Xi Jinping’s Visit To The US

With Chinese President Xi Jinping scheduled to visit the United States late this month, U.S. commentators and presidential hopefuls are debating whether Xi’s planned state visit should be downgraded or even cancelled. Organizers of the visit settled on the September timing knowing full well the presidential campaign would likely produce a toxic media environment.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Sri Lanka: A Lesson For U.S. Strategy

Colombo’s interactions with the great powers should provide lessons for Washington on a re-emerging paradigm in world politics, one that it should note in its approach to the Middle East. A reprioritization of certain drivers of foreign policy is needed in order to successfully compete with China in the future multipolar world order.

Read Here – The Diplomat

The Islamic State’s First Year

The fall of Mosul, the second-largest city in Iraq, was both the culmination of a blitzkrieg campaign IS had started in winter 2013 in Iraq and in Syria, seizing the city of Raqqa in May of that year, and the prelude to a wider strategic phase to deepen and expand the group’s dominance. Over the past year, IS has held on to Mosul and Raqqa and, in May, captured two more cities in Iraq and Syria, Ramadi and Palmyra; governed swaths of territory over the two Levantine countries; and oversaw an economy with large-scale revenues owing primarily to oil sales from the captured Iraqi fields. Making inroads with the local tribes, shielding the residents of the cities it controls from criminality and paying salaries to its foot soldiers, IS has also displaced — not without an ongoing fight — the once all-mighty global Islamist group al-Qaeda.

Read Here – Al Monitor

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: