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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “water”

The Big Leak

The pervasiveness of clothing made in China in U.S. markets is certainly one of the things that comes to mind when talking about the balance of trade between the two nations. But there is a hidden price tag on all the clothing that is made in China. It’s a considerable sum—and growing—that is skewing the trade relationship and putting its future at risk. That hidden price tag is water.

Read Here – Wilson Quarterly

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The Developing World’s Water crisis has Arrived

Developing economies across Asia, Africa and South America, known as the Global South, are steadily running out of drinking water and accessing what is available is blowing a major hole in household budgets, a study across 15 cities has revealed. The study says the water crisis is severely “underestimated” and privatising water supplies in some places has exacerbated the problem.

Read Here – Asia Times

How India Will React To The Rise Of China: The Soft-Balancing Strategy Reconsidered

It may well be possible to manage the China-India rivalry, but with each passing year, India’s challenges vis-a-vis China are becoming more intractable. Until recently, the rivalry centered on the territorial conflict over the un-demarcated Himalayan border….Beyond the territorial dispute, today the rivalry encompasses competition over water sharing (especially due to China’s efforts to dam the water that flows from Tibet into the Brahmaputra River), trade imbalance, membership in international institutions, and China’s foray into India’s traditional sphere of influence in the Indian Ocean as well as India’s own increasing interests in the Asia-Pacific and Africa.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Cape Town Is An Omen

Cape Town, South Africa. Photo/LBS

Day Zero is still hypothetical, but Cape Town’s reality will soon impact many global cities, where water will become a constant concern, and democracy will become contingent upon the taps.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Water Crises Aren’t Coming—They’re Here

Photo courtesy: Asian Development Bank

For eons, the earth has had the same amount of water—no more, no less. What the ancient Romans used for crops and Nefertiti drank? It’s the same stuff we bathe with. Yet with more than seven billion people on the planet, experts now worry we’re running out of usable water. The symptoms are here: multiyear droughts, large-scale crop failures, a major city—Cape Town—on the verge of going dry, increasing outbreaks of violence, fears of full-scale water wars. The big question: How do we keep the H20 flowing?

Read Here – Esquire

What Happens When A Major World City Runs Dry?

Residents of this coastal city of 4 million have begun stockpiling bottled water and lining up at natural springs. The reason? Cape Town, a global tourist destination and South Africa’s second-largest city, may soon switch off its taps. Dams are running low in the midst of an extreme three-year drought, one that has been compounded by extended delays in new infrastructure investments. “Day Zero” — the date when officials plan to shut down the municipal supply and start dispensing rations from some 200 collection points — is now expected to arrive in June, a month after the winter rains usually begin.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

China Is Waging A Water War On India

Beijing is fashioning water into a political weapon by denying India flood-related hydrological data since May, even as major flooding has hit the region from Assam to Uttar Pradesh. Data on upstream river flows is essential for flood forecasting and warning in order to save lives and reduce material losses. China’s data denial crimps flash flood modelling in India.

Read Here – Hindustan Times

6 Numbers That Prove The Future Is African

By 2030 one in five people will be African. Combine the continent’s soaring population with technology, improvements in infrastructure, health and education, and Africa could be the next century’s economic growth powerhouse.

Read Here – World Economic Forum

Should India Rein In China’s Dangerous Antics In Tibet?

By bringing its position on Tibet into alignment with China’s claim, India has not won Chinese gratitude; rather, it has boosted Beijing’s clout and encouraged Chinese re-engineering of transboundary river flows, on which India is critically dependent.

Read Here – Nikkei Asian Review

Pakistan’s Coal Expansion Brings Misery To Villagers In Thar Desert

The Thar desert in Sindh province contains 175 billion tonnes of lignite coal – one of the largest untapped coal deposits in the world. It is also one of the most populated deserts in the world – home to world heritages sites and endangered species. Most of the 1.6 million people who live in the Thar desert region live in poverty and are highly vulnerable to extreme weather events. Twenty five per cent of people live within the proposed coal development area.

Read Here – thethirdpole.net

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