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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Communists”

Could 1989 Have Led to Democracy In China?

There are two great “what if” questions in modern Chinese history. The first was in 1949, which is when China fell to the Communists. What if the Nationalists had been more effective on the battlefield? What if the United States had given them more support? What if Chiang Kai-Shek had won the civil war instead of being exiled to Taiwan? What if?… The second great “what if” is 1989, and it’s much more important. It’s when China almost turned toward democracy.

Read Here – The National Interest

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Young, Hipster And Red: Meet Russia’s New Generation Of Communists

The crusty shell of Russia’s Communist Party may be associated with pensioners, but the movement is undergoing a face-lift.

Read Here – The Moscow Times

27 Days Of Hell: When China And Vietnam Went To War

Several of Vietnam’s state-controlled news outlets have in recent days recalled the country’s 1979 border war with China, until now a strictly taboo topic. Such a recollection may signal that the ruling Communist Party of Vietnam has finally eased censorship of the short-lived but bloody military conflict.

Read Here – The National Interest

China Talks About Harmony, But Feeds Global Disorder

Anyone familiar with the foreign policy rhetoric emanating from Beijing for the past three decades or more has heard talk of China’s “good neighbour policy,” its “peaceful rise” and its aspirations to contribute to a “harmonious world,” by way of “a new type of great power relations.” China pledged under Deng Xiaoping to pursue a “good neighbour policy,” and China arguably followed through on that for the next three decades.

Read Here – The National Interest

Tibet And China 65 Years Later

May 23rd marked the 65th anniversary of the Chinese annexation of Tibet. That was the day the “Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet” was declared in the aftermath of the Chinese invasion of October, 1950. The document was rejected by many Tibetans at the time, and has been controversial ever since.

Read Here – Jstor Daily

Next Door Nepal: The Communist Comeback

A series of meetings over the last two weeks — especially between Maoist chief Prachanda and K.P. Sharma Oli, chairman of the Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist Leninist (CPN-UML) — to bury their bitter past seems to have sent across a message that it was poor leadership that came in the way of the timely delivery of the constitution and earthquake relief, and that the two lapses are interlinked.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Why Do China’s Leaders Dye Their Hair?

Beneath a giant hammer and sickle, the elite at the top of the Communist Party assembled for the country’s annual parliament session last week, all wearing the same unofficial uniform. As they stood to listen to the county’s national anthem, the politicians stood in perfect rows, spaced a few feet apart. Each person had a white teacup and a copy of the premier’s upcoming speech on the desk directly in front on them. From a distance, it was nearly impossible to distinguish one leader from another. At the top levels of the Communist Party, it seems, leaders take pains to blend in with one another.

Read Here – BBC

Next Round Of Power Jockeying Begins In China

Even as Xi Jinping gets ready to assume the presidency of China this month, jockeying has begun for 2017 when rising stars of the ruling Communist Party move into top leadership posts. China’s first and second generation Communist Party leaders, such as Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, ruled as single paramount leaders. But over the past two decades, Chinese leaders have tried to institutionalize governance with an emphasis on collective leadership – except when it comes to choosing leaders.

Read Here – Reuters

China’s princelings come of age in new leadership

In China they are known as “princelings” — the privileged children of the revolutionary founders of the People’s Republic of China. And in the generational leadership change that just took place in Beijing, it could not have been clearer that having the right family bloodlines is among the most important attributes an ambitious cadre could possess.

Of the seven men who now comprise the Communist Party’s new politburo standing committee, the apex of political power in China, four are members of “the red aristocracy”, led by the new general secretary of the party, Xi Jinping.

The thriving of the princelings should not be a surprise, analysts and party insiders say. Rarely in its six decades in power has the party been under more stress. Public anger over widespread corruption, widening income inequality and vast environmental degradation have chipped away at its legitimacy.

Read Here – Reuters

Xi-Li Inherit Weakest Economy Growth Since Deng Opened China

China’s new leaders are poised to inherit the weakest economic growth since Deng Xiaopingthree decades ago and may need to borrow from his market-opening tool kit to avert a steeper decline. As the Communist Party prepares to anoint Vice President Xi Jinping, 59, and Vice Premier Li Keqiang, 57, next month as its so-called fifth generation in charge, data from exports to production signal the government will struggle this year to reach its 7.5 percent expansion target. The retiring top echelon took power in 2003 with growth above 9 percent and their predecessors were bequeathed a 14 percent pace in 1993, a year after Deng toured the southern boomtowns he’d spawned, urging more change.

Read Here – Bloomberg

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