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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Global Economy”

Reaping The Benefits Of African Economic Integration

Africa must industrialise to diversify away from natural resources and create jobs for its fast-growing young population. And by boosting intra-continental trade, consumption, and investment, regional integration can be a strong vector for improving productivity, building manufacturing powerhouses, and developing credible African brands.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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The Age Of Uneasy Peace

…the post–Cold War interregnum of U.S. hegemony is over, and bipolarity is set to return, with China playing the role of the junior superpower. The transition will be a tumultuous, perhaps even violent, affair, as China’s rise sets the country on a collision course with the United States over a number of clashing interests. But as Washington slowly retreats from some of its diplomatic and military engagements abroad, Beijing has no clear plan for filling this leadership vacuum and shaping new international norms from the ground up.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Biggest Threats To China’s Economy In 2018

China’s economy begins 2018 facing what its own leaders call three years of “critical battles.” Those fights to tackle domestic debt, poverty and pollution pose a hat-trick of risks to the world’s No. 2 economy even before higher interest rates and trade war threats from the U.S. are taken into account. While the nation is starting from a position of strength, with full-year growth in 2017 poised for its first acceleration since 2010, the expansion is seen slowing in 2018.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Will Xi Jinping’s Second Term Bring ‘New Cycle’ For The Economy?

A growing number of economists are joining the chorus forecasting the arrival of a stronger Chinese economy under President Xi Jinping – a stark contrast from a year ago, when China was seen as a source of instability for the world. Although Beijing has delivered scant evidence that it is taming its debt mountain, the optimists are starting to make their voices heard over talk of a hard landing or crisis in China’s growth narrative.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Trump Must Tread Carefully With His Asian Bankers

As Donald Trump angles to make America’s debt burden great again, he has some finessing to do with his bankers. No, not Russia in this case, but China and Japan, both by far the biggest holders of U.S. Treasuries with a combined $2.3 trillion. South Korea’s $95 billion stockpile also has folks in Seoul curious about President Trump adding at least $1.5 trillion of debt for giant tax cuts America doesn’t need.

Read Here – Asia Times

Donald Trump’s China Policy Has A 1985 Problem

Donald Trump once famously owned New York’s Plaza Hotel. Perhaps it’s no coincidence, then, that his economic worldview, and policies toward China, are stuck in a time when that pop-culture landmark found itself at the very centre of global markets.

Read Here – Mint

China’s Big Sticks

The Trump administration’s China-bashing strategy is based on the mistaken belief that a newly muscular US has all the leverage in dealing with its presumed adversary, and that any Chinese response is hardly worth considering. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Read Here – Project-Syndicate

The Death Of OPEC

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries is dead. Saudi Arabia killed it. Now, OPEC is just a toothless zombie, attracting attention, but without having any impact on the living.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

In Xi Jinping, Echoes of Reagan

With the world looking to China for assurance that it can manage its slowing economy and tumultuous stock market, President Xi Jinping has begun pushing a remedy that sounds less like Marx and Mao than Reagan and Thatcher.

Read Here – The Boston Globe

How Would The Next U.S. President Deal With China?

The new president of the United States will have to deal with a rising and more assertive China on a wide range of issues, including Asia-Pacific security, trade, and cybersecurity. U.S.-China relations will likely continue to be a mix of competition and cooperation. The central question for bilateral relations is: Can the world’s two largest economies avoid increased competition and even conflict?

Read Here – Council for Foreign Affairs

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