The Changing Map Of Economics

The global economy and capitalism are at a crossroads, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, the rise of digital technology, and the changing nature of labor markets. Understanding this new world will require major breakthroughs in economic thinking, and closer scrutiny of some of the discipline’s core assumptions. Read More Here

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How China Is Helping To Damp Global Inflation

As China’s factory-gate prices soared this year, investors worried the country would become a new source of inflation for the rest of the world. Instead, the world’s second-largest economy has helped alleviate some price pressures caused by the pandemic, and appears likely to keep doing so—at least for a while. Read More Here

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The Return Of Inflation?

Though they have received most of the attention, supply bottlenecks are hardly the only factor to consider when assessing the recent surge of inflation. Far more important are broader structural changes in the economy and the alarmingly complacent attitude of central banks. Read More Here

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Is Inflation Alive?

Inflation in most rich countries has been low since the 1990s, not least because of central banks’ success in lowering long-term inflation expectations. But today’s policymakers must weigh how far they can go in trying to engineer a post-pandemic recovery without unanchoring these firmly entrenched beliefs. Read Here | Project Syndicate

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Who’s Right On Inflation?

As in the 1970s, a severe economic shock has forced governments to pursue massive fiscal and monetary expansion, thereby sowing fears of future inflation. But not all shocks are the same, and the key question now is whether we can be confident that the current state of exception will end. Read Here | Project Syndicate

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The Growing Risk Of A Global Recession And Crisis In 2020

Beyond the US, the fragility of growth in debt-ridden China and some other emerging markets remains a concern, as do economic, policy, financial and political risks in Europe. Worse, across the advanced economies, the policy toolbox for responding to a crisis remains limited. The monetary and fiscal interventions and private-sector backstops used after the 2008 […]

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