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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Politics”

Why Protesters Keep Hurling Milkshakes At British Politicians

Milkshakes haven’t always been the obvious choice for political protesters trying to make a statement. While people in other countries have opted to pelt politicians with noodles or yogurt, in Britain the traditional projectile of protest is the egg. Even the most senior of British politicians, from former Prime Minister David Cameron to former Labour Party leader Ed Miliband, have been hit with them. The reason for the egg’s popularity is simple: It is light, compact, and apart from the occasional rotten one, it is a seemingly innocuous tool of protest.

Read Here – The Atlantic

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I Wanted Ronald Reagan. India Kept Electing Bernie Sanders.

In some ways Mr. Modi has proved more statist than the Gandhis. Before he took power he criticised Congress welfare programs as insulting to the poor, who “do not want things for free” and really want “to work and earn a living.” As prime minister, Mr. Modi doubled down on the same programs, expanding the landmark 2006 act that guaranteed 100 days of pay to all rural workers, whether they worked or not.

Read Here – The New York Times

What Will India Look Like If Modi Returns To Power?

Indian liberals fear that a second term for Prime Minister Narendra Modi might prompt a decisive turn against the country’s secular traditions, much as the American left fears that Donald Trump’s return would irreparably harm U.S. democratic institutions. This Modi-as-strongman thesis places India squarely within a global autocratic resurgence, featuring a familiar tableau of leaders from Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Trump Revs Up The Battle Over Immigration

The heart of the proposal is a turnaround on who the United States accepts as legal immigrants. Currently, two-thirds of new immigrants are granted stay because of some kind of familiar connection already living in the United States; immigration enthusiasts refer to this as family reunification, while immigration restrictionists refer to it as chain migration.

Read Here – The National Interest

Iran’s Other Generation Gap, 40 Years On

As the Islamic Republic enters its fifth decade, keeping the revolution “alive” will depend on the ability of its image-makers not only to appeal to a younger population that wants change but also to build consensus among members of the younger generation within the regime’s own ranks. The task before the Islamic Republic is to win over a broad cross section of its citizens while simultaneously defining what shape its revolutionary project, and its state apparatus, will take over the long term.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Africa Is A Continent On The Brink … But Of What?

 

It makes sense that a continent home to 54 countries and 1.2 billion people would also house a mass of contradictory developments. Africa features several of the world’s fastest-growing economies and a burgeoning middle class. But much of the continent remains mired in debt, ravaged by conflict, disease or terrorism, and plagued by elites clinging to power.

Read Here – World Politics Review

Could 1989 Have Led to Democracy In China?

There are two great “what if” questions in modern Chinese history. The first was in 1949, which is when China fell to the Communists. What if the Nationalists had been more effective on the battlefield? What if the United States had given them more support? What if Chiang Kai-Shek had won the civil war instead of being exiled to Taiwan? What if?… The second great “what if” is 1989, and it’s much more important. It’s when China almost turned toward democracy.

Read Here – The National Interest

China’s Selective Memory

This year’s anniversaries of the 1919 and 1989 student protests in China will again highlight the Chinese authorities’ contradictory attitudes toward the two movements. As the People’s Republic looks ahead to the 70th anniversary of its founding this October, the country continues to reckon with its own history.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

During Its Civil War, Sri Lanka Was a Garrison State; Will The Easter Attacks Turn It Back Into One?

The Easter Sunday attacks in Sri Lanka against Christian targets that killed hundreds raises obvious concerns of remilitarizing a society still getting over the scars of war. The worst violence the country has seen since its longstanding civil war ended almost exactly ten years ago is naturally being discussed at least partly in that war’s context. But while the means of warfare are similar, the motivations are different.

Read Here – Modern War Institute

The Pakistani Military’s Worst Nightmare Is Coming True

For decades, Pakistan’s powerful military has been in control of the country’s politics whether directly, as during several decades of military dictatorships, or indirectly, as during attempts by civilian leaders to reassert their authority in the 1970s, 1990s, and after 2008. In their efforts to wrest control from the military, plenty of Pakistani politicians have been defeated and dismissed from office. So dire was their record that, at times, challenging the brass seemed like a fight not worth picking.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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