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Archive for the tag “Politics”

Who Is Russia’s New Prime Minister?

When Russians woke up last Wednesday morning, most had likely never heard of Mikhail Mishustin, the head of the country’s tax service. But by the time they went to bed that night, Mishustin had been named as Russia’s new prime minister after a day that included a flurry of proposed changes to the constitution and a series of dramatic shake-ups that saw the government resign en masse. It was the first real inkling of the power transfer to come, with President Vladimir Putin set to reach his constitutionally imposed term limit in 2024.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Tsai Ing-Wen Re-Elected As Taiwan President As Rival Concedes Defeat

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen won a second term on Saturday with a victory over Han Kuo-yu, in an election that had been cast as a referendum on the island’s approach to Beijing. Tsai, from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), had been a hot favourite to see off the challenges of Han, from the mainland-friendly Kuomintang (KMT) party, and  James Soong Chu-yu, from the People First Party.

A New, Fractured Global Order Is Upon Us

It is increasingly clear to communities and countries that the distribution of agency in the international system is inequitable and no longer reflects contemporary realities. It is this anger and disappointment, directed against globalisation, that has powered the rise of these strongmen and women.

Read Here – The Indian Express

What Happened To India?

The India the world once celebrated – the world’s fastest-growing free-market liberal democracy – seems to be giving way to a violent, intolerant, illiberal autocracy. It is a turn that was long in the making, reflecting the impact of eight major factors on the country’s society and politics.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Also Read: Is India Still A Democracy?

Riot Acts

History shows that tumult is a companion to democracy and when ordinary politics fails, the people must take to the streets.

Read Here – Aeon

Also Read: Are Riots Good For Democracy

The Muslim World’s Nightmare Decade

A new era for the Muslim world would de-emphasise the purist obsession with minutiae and rituals, and emphasise the overarching moral codes of egalitarianism and compassion that are at the core of Islamic teaching. It would embrace the critical thinking that was key to the Islamic Golden Age, which kept the flame of progress alive in the Medieval era.

Read Here – Buzzfeed

10 Conflicts To Watch In 2020

Local conflicts serve as mirrors for global trends. The ways they ignite, unfold, persist, and are resolved reflect shifts in great powers’ relations, the intensity of their competition, and the breadth of regional actors’ ambitions. They highlight issues with which the international system is obsessed and those toward which it is indifferent. Today these wars tell the story of a global system caught in the early swell of sweeping change—and of regional leaders both emboldened and frightened by the opportunities such a transition presents.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Loser Teens

In keeping with the adage that history does not repeat but rhymes, the decade from 2010 to 2020 ushered in a new age of disorder and distrust, just as the 1810s and 1910s did. Each era shows how unmet promises and unrealized hopes inevitably lead to disillusion and cynicism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Asia in 2020: Trends, Risks, And Geopolitics

How Asia is changing and what are the challenges for 2020 … a presidential election year in the United States and how it will change the dynamics between Washington and key Asian capitals after a bruising trade war with China that impacted the global economy. Then there are elections in Taiwan, North Korea.. and other elephants in the room.

Hear Here – The Diplomat

How A World Order Ends And What Comes In Its Wake

A stable world order is a rare thing. When one does arise, it tends to come after a great convulsion that creates both the conditions and the desire for something new. It requires a stable distribution of power and broad acceptance of the rules that govern the conduct of international relations. It also needs skillfull statecraft, since an order is made, not born.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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