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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Politics”

Inside The Secret Meeting That Changed China

The rest of the world may be marking the 30-year anniversary of the Tiananmen crisis as a crucial episode in China’s recent past. For the Chinese government, however, Tiananmen remains a frightening portent. Even though the regime has wiped the events of June 4 from the memories of most of China’s people, they are still living in the aftermath.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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India’s Cult Of Modi

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi being sworn in for his second five-year term after a stupendous election victory. Photo/PIB

The recent Indian election will be a case study in how to upend the conventional assumption of electoral politics that an incumbent is judged on his record of performance against his own promises. Prime Minister Narendra Modi fulfilled none of his, so why did voters reward him with a landslide victory?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Gandhi Dynasty Helped Found India. It Is Now in Demise

Amid the Bharatiya Janata Party’s landslide victory in India’s parliamentary elections, one result stood out, in the town of Amethi, near the border with Nepal. There, the family that has dominated Indian politics since the country’s independence more than 70 years ago suffered a humiliating blow: Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the opposition Congress Party, lost his seat.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Are Indian Democracy’s Weaknesses Inherent?

The standard contrast between Chinese authoritarian efficiency and Indian democratic dysfunction is, however, too simplistic. Authoritarianism is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for some of the special features of Chinese governance. Similarly, not all of the Indian state’s shortcomings are inherent in the country’s democratic system. Failure to appreciate such nuances risks overlooking three especially important governance issues.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

It’s Modi’s India Now

It seems that the BJP’s formula of focusing on national security and identity politics, along with channeling Modi’s clear charisma and oratory powers, overshadowed any competing vision. And in that sense, perhaps the change isn’t just at the top; Indians themselves may have changed. A new generation of younger Indians yearn for a more positive self-definition and image. In the flashy, pro-Hindu, globetrotting Modi, they see a bit of themselves too.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Theresa May Announces Her Resignation

Theresa May has bowed to intense pressure from her own party and named 7 June as the day she will step aside as Conservative leader, drawing her turbulent three-year premiership to a close. Speaking in Downing Street, May said it had been “the honour of my life” to serve as Britain’s second prime minister. Her voice breaking, she said she would leave “with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude”.

Read Here – The Guardian

Why Protesters Keep Hurling Milkshakes At British Politicians

Milkshakes haven’t always been the obvious choice for political protesters trying to make a statement. While people in other countries have opted to pelt politicians with noodles or yogurt, in Britain the traditional projectile of protest is the egg. Even the most senior of British politicians, from former Prime Minister David Cameron to former Labour Party leader Ed Miliband, have been hit with them. The reason for the egg’s popularity is simple: It is light, compact, and apart from the occasional rotten one, it is a seemingly innocuous tool of protest.

Read Here – The Atlantic

I Wanted Ronald Reagan. India Kept Electing Bernie Sanders.

In some ways Mr. Modi has proved more statist than the Gandhis. Before he took power he criticised Congress welfare programs as insulting to the poor, who “do not want things for free” and really want “to work and earn a living.” As prime minister, Mr. Modi doubled down on the same programs, expanding the landmark 2006 act that guaranteed 100 days of pay to all rural workers, whether they worked or not.

Read Here – The New York Times

What Will India Look Like If Modi Returns To Power?

Indian liberals fear that a second term for Prime Minister Narendra Modi might prompt a decisive turn against the country’s secular traditions, much as the American left fears that Donald Trump’s return would irreparably harm U.S. democratic institutions. This Modi-as-strongman thesis places India squarely within a global autocratic resurgence, featuring a familiar tableau of leaders from Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Trump Revs Up The Battle Over Immigration

The heart of the proposal is a turnaround on who the United States accepts as legal immigrants. Currently, two-thirds of new immigrants are granted stay because of some kind of familiar connection already living in the United States; immigration enthusiasts refer to this as family reunification, while immigration restrictionists refer to it as chain migration.

Read Here – The National Interest

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