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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “politicians”

Why Protesters Keep Hurling Milkshakes At British Politicians

Milkshakes haven’t always been the obvious choice for political protesters trying to make a statement. While people in other countries have opted to pelt politicians with noodles or yogurt, in Britain the traditional projectile of protest is the egg. Even the most senior of British politicians, from former Prime Minister David Cameron to former Labour Party leader Ed Miliband, have been hit with them. The reason for the egg’s popularity is simple: It is light, compact, and apart from the occasional rotten one, it is a seemingly innocuous tool of protest.

Read Here – The Atlantic

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The New Disappeared

From the military juntas that ruled Argentina and Chile in the 1970s and 1980s to Joseph Stalin’s iron-fisted regime in the Soviet Union, dictatorships have a long history of making their detractors “disappear.” Today, this sinister practice seems to be making a comeback.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

CPEC: The goose with the golden eggs

Betting its fate on Pakistan with a $51-billion investment in infrastructure, China remains wary of its neighbour’s squint-eyed politicians who have proven their lack of vision over the years. Many of these politicians can’t see beyond the impending election woes.

Read Here – The Express Tribune

Rise of the Chest-Thumpers

History clearly didn’t end with the triumph of market capitalism and democracy. Those who seek to disprove this old dogma often point to the eruption of radical Islam and the counteroffensive by the West — two events which have indeed overshadowed the last decade in many countries. But history has accelerated more dramatically — in the wrong direction — in three nations that contain a much larger part of the world’s population.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Dhaka And Its “Hartals”

When Dhaka’s street battles began to intensify earlier this year, the ambulances started to pour out onto the streets. Going to pick up the dead and injured? In many cases, no. Instead, they were often used to shuttle expats, businessmen and rich kids to airports, offices and garment factories.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Japan’s Silver Generation Needs See Gold

Japan has two problems: It is rapidly aging, and its older citizens will not let politicians do anything about it. The country’s leaders must start thinking less about elderly voters and more about young families, or Japan’s economic prospects will remain grim.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Africa Rising?

Is Africa rising? Judging by the buzz and optimism of the young business leaders and political trailblazers from across the continent who gathered in Cape Town for the World Economic Forum on Africa recently, the answer is a qualified “yes.”

Read Here – The Hindu

Putin The Protector

President Vladimir Putin‘s improbable rise to the pinnacle of Russian power in 1999-2000 was partly the result of an elite consensus about the importance of restoring order to the Russian state after a decade of domestic crisis and international humiliation.

Read Here – Moscow Times

The Ghost of 1984 Still Haunts India

The anti-Sikh riots of 1984 still haunt the ruling Indian National Congress. Almost three decades ago around 3,000 minority Sikhs were killed, allegedly at the instigation of local Congress leaders in Delhi in the aftermath of the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi by her two Sikh bodyguards, Beant Singh and Satwant Singh, on October 31, 1984.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Putin’s Leadership Trap

When elected president in 2000,Vladimir Putin‘s first order of business seemed straightforward: strengthen the Russian state and bring it back from oligarchic control and regional warlordism. Consolidation was in order.

There were two ways to achieve that.

Read Here – Moscow Times

 

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